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Full text of "Weymouth High School/Technical High School yearbook"

PROPERTY OF THE 



TUFTS LIBRARY 

WEYMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS 

w.c. 

Ref. 

Added Class No. 

19^6 

Author ..^y™?^*!? High _School_ 

Tit]t . Yearbook 



REFLECTOR 
1946 



REFLECTOR 




1946 



Class Colors Class Motto 

Mauoon and Gold Honor and Loyalty 



Published by Students of Weymouth High School 
Weymouth, Massachusetts 



The Reflector is published by students of Weymouth 
High School, Weymouth, Massachusetts. Editor. Nancy 
Page; Business Manager, Richard Swan; Faculty 
Advisers. Prescott I!. Brown, Miss Helen A. Chase, 
and James F. Steele. 

Printed by Students of the Printing Department 
Weymouth Vocational School 
Harry F. Duncan, Instructor 



JAN 1 2 '84 



DEDICATION 



The members of the Class of 1 94 6 wish 
to dedicate this yearbook to 
Mr. Elmer S. Mapes, 
our Superintendent of Schools. 
May his years in Weymouth be ones 
of happiness and success. 



Four- Year High Honors 



Kurt Konrad 
Lisbeth Koopman 
Robert Edward Lyons 
Evelyn Newell 



Martha Elizabeth Nickcrson 
Shirley May Rideout 
David Fenwick Stephenson 
Carolyn Joyce Strait 



Four- Year Honors 



Frank Joseph Aiello 
James Merton Brayshaw 
James Paul Casey 
John Bernard Coyle 
Walter Richard Hansen 
Helen Shirley Hilliard 
Barbara Ann Husband 
Robert Scbring Karnan 
Helen Elizabeth Keblis 
John Joseph Lynch 
Chester Alexander MacKenzie 



Sara Anne Mapes 
Allan James Masison 
Mary Elizabeth Merten 
Francis Leo Newcomb 
Nancy Page 
Jeanne Perrow 
Margaret Ann Rockwood 
Jessie Evelyn T. Smith 
Richard Archer Taylor 
Helen Ruth Toomey 
Richard Hunt Whittle 



Former students who left Weymouth High School to 
join the Armed Services of the United States and who 
have completed the diploma requirements 
during this school year. 



Class of 

Herbert Bates Clapp 1944 

John Alexander Clark 1942 

William Augustus Coveney, Jr. 1943 

Frederick Arthur Cowles 1942 

John Arthur Culver 1945 

Orlando Angelo Grillo 1944 

Bruce Gideon Hevenor 1944 

George Joseph Hodgdon 1944 

Oliver Jarvis Howe, Jr. 1942 

Donald Earl Libby 1941 

Page Six 



Class of 

Roy Neil Livingstone 1944 

Robert John McGrory 1944 

Richard Calloway Monks 1942 

Robert Lawrence Nickerson 1943 

Robert Sanger Petze 1945 

Frank Lewis Quimby 1943 

John Richard Saferian 1941 

Robert Allan Shepherd 1944 

Richard Thayer Spear 1945 

Carl Bernard Voigt 1940 



Contents 



Dedication 5 

Four'Year Honor Roll 6 

Faculty <§ 

Class Officers 10 

Vocational Officers 1 1 

Class Census 12 

Class Histoty 13 

Class Prophecy 23 

High Honor Essays 35 

Senior Who's Who 43 

Advertisements 87 

The Perfect Senior 42 

Class Activities 65 

Class Will 85 



(T^V, Page Seven 



FACULTY 



WALLACE L. WHITTLE, Principal 

rhou art our guide, philosopher and friend. 

THOMAS A. LYONS. Asst. Principal 

He is always smiling, because he has an in- 
finite deal of wit. 

FRANCIS E. WHIPPLE, Vocational Director 
The wise man is his own best assistant. 

KAY (.. PARKER, Asst. Vocational Directoi 
Blessed is he who has found his work. 

RUTH E. GILLIS, Secretary 

Always read) with a helping hand. 

MARION B. IORTIER, Secretary 
True to her word, her work, and her friends. 

DOROTHY COREY, Asst. Secretary 

Every good deed is a benefit to the doer as 
well as to the receiver. 

HARRY ARLANSON. Director of Physical 
Education 
A perfect gentleman from head to toe. 

LEWIS H. BACON, JR., .lulu Mechanics 

Strong in thyself and powerful to give 
strength. 

ESTHER L. BENSON, Home Economics 
Success is 99% ingenuity and i" /0 luck. 

JAMES F. BOL AND, Sheet Mela! 

Confidence is the companion of success. 

1'RESCOTT B. BROWN, English 

Knowledge is a treasure, but practice is the 
key to it. 

D. EVERETT BRYAN. Auto Mechanics 

Skill and confidence are an unconquerable 
army. 

GEORGE J. BUTLER, 'Supervisor of Attendance 
He guides us on our way. 

ERNESTINE R. CANNING, French 
"l is good will makes intelligence. 

HELEN A. CHASE, English 

Never an idle moment but thrift) and 
thoughtful of others. 

HAROLD E. CLARKE. Sheet Metal 
Virtue and sense are one. 

JOHN K. DELAHUNT, Economics, Science 
The secret to success is constancy to pin pose. 

HARRY E. DUNCAN, Printing 

Profound sincerity is (he onl) basis of talent 
as of character. 



ALICE K. FAY, Commercial 
Inwardness, mildness, and self-renouncemenl 
make I01 happiness. 

ELEANOR FREEMAN. Librarian 

A book is a friend that nevei deceives us. 

JOHN I . GANNON, Latin 
A day's work w ill hurt no one. 

JOHN T. GHIORSE. Aviation, Union 

A cheerful man is a double blessing — a blessing 
to himself and to the world around him. 

W VL1 ER C. GUI I ERSON. Guidance 
\ true friend and helper. 

OLIVE E. HACKETT, Commercial 
She is wise and uses her wisdom well. 

RUSSELL H. JACK, Music 

His sweetest pleasure is that ol imparting 
music. 

LILLIAN J EI- I S. Spanish 

The good and the wise lead epiiet lives. 

RITA M. JONES. English, Mathematics, Science, 
Social Science, Ancient History 
Sometimes gay and sometimes grave. 

FR ANC IS N. KELLY. Co, inner, nil 

Congenial at heart and born to be a friend. 

GEORGE H. KLAY, Drawing, Mathematics 
To be a friend is one of life's greatest assets. 

M \ RGARET K. LANGFORD, Commercial 
Efficiency is first with her. 

NORMAN 1). LOLD. Physics 
Without haste! Without rest! 

CLARENCE R. LYOND, Science 

Trouble and Sorrow are never at his side. 

HELEN G. LYONS. English. History 
A good name is bettei than riches. 

DOROTHY G. MacGREGOR, Commercial 
All things are difficult before they are easy. 

OTTO H. MAHN. Citizenship, Economics, 

Mathematics, Physical Education, Placement 
leaching others teacheth yourself. 

JOHN F. MARTIN, Social Science 
Good Advice 
Is beyond price. 

DAVID P. MATTHEWS, Mathematics, Science 
There are main ways to fame. 

RUTH E. MAYO, Science 
There is no time like the present. 



Page Eight 



RUSSELL H. MAZZOLA, Aviation. Mathematics, 
Science 

I dream of quiet study halls. 

GEORGE J. McCAR I HY, Social Science 
Speech is the picture of the mind. 

MARY E. McMORROW, English, Mathematics 
I hough ts arc free. 

ROBERT E. Ml rCHELL, Social Science 
Who knows most says least. 

DORO I in I . MURPHY, Ancient History, 
English, Mathematics 
A keen mind makes keen minds. 

HAROLD R. NELSON, Agriculture 
Perfection with gentleness. 

HILMER S. NELSON, Head of Agriculture 
A seed, well cultivated, produces best results. 

|ALMAR N. NELSON, Aero nun I its, 
Mathematics 
Makes the art of Hying seem simple. 

HELEN M. NORRIS, Commercial 
W ords never fail her. 

VIRGINIA NYE, Guidance 

W ise, and always pleasant and helpful, 

CHARLOTTE M. OPPLER (Mrs.), German, 
French 

We shall speak in diverse tongues. 

ORAL A. PAGE, Physical Ed ileal ion 
A good mind needs a good body. 

ELIZABETH L. PALMER, English, French 
\ welcome addition to our faculty, 

DOROTHY PEARSON, English, Social Science 
The best! 

DOROTHY L. PETERSON, Physical Education 
Exercise well; 
Slav in line. 
That's it, girls, 
You're doing line. 

ANITA L. PETRUCCI, English, French 
Her voice is soft, her manner mild. 
Upon her Fortune surely smiled. 

JAMES H. POLLARD, English, Science 
Obstacles were invented to create thought. 

BARBARA H. PRAY, Ancient History 
A stern aspect belies her better nature. 

MARION L. RAY (Mrs.) , Commercial 
Softly speak and sweetly smile. 
Patience is hers, all the while. 



ALVAH RAYMOND, Mathematics, Aviation, 
Science 

Good humor accompanies his thorough teach 
ing. 

HELENA F. REIDY, Latin, Socml Science 

Latin — she teaches the subject with an accurate 
hand. 

Making it easier for all to understand. 

ARTHUR 11. SCO I I . Science 

A pleasant smile and friendliness are with him 
everywhere. 

HAROLD C. SHERWOOD. Cabinetmaking 
A builder ol material and men. 

ROSE SILVERMAN, Commercial 
Friends — she has many. 
I ocs — has she any? 

EVELYN (.. SILVESTER, Art 

Her artistic touch makes this world a bettei 
place in which to live. 

EVA SKALA. Home Economics 
Efficient — she's proved it. 
Clever — yes, indeed. 
Her choice seems the wisest 
With many to feed. 

JAMES E. S TEELE, Socical Science 
Calm and quite patient, 
Gentle to know , 
But just rouse his temper — 
"Get your books! Out you go!" 

HERBERTA L. STOCKWELL, Nurse 
If you've ills, or aches, or pains, 
Tor sympathy and remedy 
See our nurse, find cure with brains 
In a steaming cup of "ginger tea". 

W ALDO H. SW AN, Mathematics 
Always ready with helpful advice. 

MARY F. TOOMEY, English 
Gentleness leads her on her helpful way. 

MAR I HA MNING, Latin 
Intelligence is also hers. 

ALICE WHITE, English, Social Science 
Always ready to understand, 
Always willing to lend a hand. 

JOSEPH K. WHITTEMORE, English, Hisloiy, 
Social Science 
Food for body and mind are equally important. 

M. JEAN YOUNG, Commercial 

Consistancy, patience, and an even disposition 
are a few of her virtues. 



c^Sl* Page Nine 




Page Ten 



VOCATIONAL 
FF ICE 




William Warren 
MacDonald, Jr. 
Vice-President 




George Robert McKinney 
Preside)] t 



CLASS MARSHAL 




Robert Bradford Stitt 



c^V, Page Eleven 



CLASS CENSUS 


Most Popular Girl 




Barbara Loud 


Most Popular Boy 




Ralph Amabile 


Wittiest 




Tames Casey 


Prettiest 




Barbara Loud 


Class Athelete 




Bruce Hunt 


Class Comedian 




Tames Casey 


Class Bookworm 




James Brayshaw 


Class Musician 




Robert McAuliffe 


Class Baby 




Robert Carter 


Class Actor 




John Pappas 


Class Actress 




Phyllis Vachon 


Class Heartbreaker 




Richard McCarthy 


Most Dependable 




Ralph Amabile 


Most Carefree 




Gerald Hackett 


V\f* Ct 1 JtTCC^n ( Tlt*l 
UCbl J ' 1 CjjCU VJ 111 






Best Dressed Boy 




Neil Doherty 


Class Sbeik 




Richard Swan 


Woman Hater 




James Brayshaw 


Most Popular With The 


Men 


Barbara Loud 


Most Popular With The 


Ladies 


Richard McCarthy 


Class Poet 




Elizabeth Dewey 


Class Artist 




Miriam Gourley 



Page Twelve •X&J 



ass History Committee 

Robert Carter, Chairman 
Robert Lyons 
Betty Paulson 
Naialie Butler 
Marjoric Abbott 
Carolyn Corridan 
Phyllis Doane 
Walter Hansen 
John McCarthy 
Francis Newcomb 
John Coyle 
John Pappas 
Richard Cronin 
Arthur Robinson 
Genevieve Rauch 
Eleanor Loud 
Elinor Humphrey 
Jean Taber 
Norman Tirrell 



CLASS HISTORY 



Characters: (in order of their apearance) 



Freshmen: Barbara Loud 

Robert Stmt (Hob) 

Sophomores: Filomena LaRocco (Filly) 
Helen Keblis (Keby) 
Robert Gilligan (15oI>I>)) 



Juniors: Ralph Amabili (Ralphie) 
Jean Keohan 

Richard McCarthy (Dick) 
George McKinney 

Seniors: Edward Caraccioi.o (Ed) 
Margaret Kelly (Marge) 



ACT I 

It is tlic last day of school. The curtains part and disclose a group of students 
loaded on a Lovell Bus. The pupils in this environment soon forget their new 
role — promotion to sophomore dignity. They are boisterous and gay in the June 
heat. 

Barbara: Gosh, how many new things we've learned this last year! Remember 
how it took me epiite a while to get accustomed to the idea of not going 
home for lunch? 

Bob: You're lucky if that's all that happened to you. If you could have been 
with me when f sauntered into a senior study room! Boy, the looks those 
seniors gave me! 

Barbara: What a swell track team we had this year! The team had a wonder- 
ful time on their nip to New York after winning the Class B title. 

Bob: Hey, J wonder if they still have those gruesome pictures that were taken 
for the office record? 

Barbara: Some permanent record, what? Our marks, plus those pictures! 
Answer — minus. 

Bob: Did you go to the Senior Play, "Growing Pains," this year? 

Barbara: Yes, I did. That was certainly a real success under the helpful super- 
vision of Miss Chase. 

Bob: We had a great deal of excitement this year. Wally Lang's being captain 
of the football team sure helped score twenty-nine straight wins before 
losing a game to Quincy. 

Barbara: Did yo\x go to the Senior Prom? That was really sharp. 

Bob: Yes, and f was late getting there because of a Hat that night on my friend's 
car. 

Barbara: That was tough. Speaking of luck, I' 11 bet the fellows on the football 
team missed not having the banquet this year; but during war times a 
shortage of food is to be expected. 

Bob: Remember the new Aviation Course that was introduced with Mr. Ghiorse 
as chief pilot? 

c^Vj Page Fifteen 



Barbara: Of course we couldn't take- it our freshman year, but some ol the boys 
wanted to. 

Bob: If I remember correctly, Ralph Amabile and Alan Dewey flubbed around 
some on the baseball diamond. 

Barbara: Not to change the subject, Bob Vergobbi was our sole representative 
on the wrestling team and Slim LuscOmbe also made a hit on the track and 
cross country teams. 

Bob: Well, we've certainly enjoyed out Inst years, especially when wc had some 
say voting for the Student Council Members. It was excitin» to find out that 
Eddie Caracciolo, Jean Cross, Alan Dewey, Margie Kelly, and you wen 
elected. (Scream of brakes) 

Barbara: Here we go again! 

Bob: What do you mean? Here we stop again. This is getting monotonous: but it's 
walking for us again. What crates! 



mm 








// 3 



ACT II 

A group of newly graduated sophomores, drinking cokes, are seated on stools 
as the curtain parts. 

Filly: Going out for cheerleader again this fall, Keby? 

Keby: Sure, I certainly want to continue supporting our various teams. They've 
certainly done well this year. 

Bobby: Our track team is doing swell. They got second place in the State meet 
at Boston. 

Keby: As usual our football team got top honors, working with Coach Arlanson. 
Filly: Bruce made a good showing, piling up all those touchdowns. 

Keby: The Athletic Banquet wasn't so hot this year, though. We certainly hated 
to say good-bye to H. Arlanson. 

Filly: All our teams need backing. We mustn't forget our basketball and baseball 
squads. 

Bobby: You can say that again. Our teams have as much spirit as any of the other 
South Shore teams. 

Filly: The Weymouth Highlights was a real success. 

Keby: You bet it was! The boys all over the world got a "kick" when they got a 
newspaper from their good old alma mater. 

Page Sixteen r \&-? 



Bobby: I think thai the strangest evenl was the hoisting of an Army training plane 
onto the second floor. 

Filly: I'll never forgei that. The kids taking the Aviation (ionise were as excited 
as a gang of jitterbugs at a jam session. 

Keby: The skit of Coac h Arlanson's life, pul on by the loot hall players, was a howl. 

Bobby: We had a lot of swell activities dining the year. The Victory Dance in 
December and the Senior Play, "Woman of Fifteen," were both good. 

Filly: Don't forget the Senior Prom. The committee did a keen job and helped 
to make it a real success. 

Bobby: I think we elected a swell student council in our freshman year. 

Filly: You're not kidding! Eddie, Barb, Al, Margie, and Jean did a grand job. 

Klby: Well, 1 guess it's time to go home to supper. I hope we have as good a 
time next year as we had this. 

Bobby: Just think! We're really upper classman now. 

Filly: I can hardly wait to get back. So long, kids! 




ACT III 

As the curtains part we behold two important juniors, chewing the rag in 
their accustomed haunt. The checkerhoard has heen pushed aside as a clanging 
upsets their meditations. 

Ralphie: Just think, Jean, we have only one more year of high school! 

Jean: It all seems to have gone so quickly, although I will say that we've had 
some pretty good times these past years. 

Rai.phie: I'll say. It certainly was an honor to be elected Class President; and I 
know Dick, Barb, and Frank feel the same about their offices. Remember 
the swell Junior Party we had? The Junior Nominating Committee and the 
Junior Party Committee certainly gave us a time to remember. 

Jean: That party really brought out some of the good talent that wc have in 
our class. Eleanor McCafferty's songs were wonderful. 



c^SV. Page Seventeen 



RAlphie: How about Betsy Clark's dancing? 

Jean: Yes, she was all right. And wasn't Lambie Koopman a riol s nging "Second 
Hand Rose"? 

(Dick McCarthy and George M(Kinn\ enter) 
Dick: Hey, what are you two doing all the talking about? 

Jean: Oh, hi, kids! We were just reminiscing over all the good times we had our 
junior year. 

Dick: We had a pretty good football team this year, didn't we? Bobby Clark sun 
played some swell games. He's in the Air Corps now. 

Ralphie: Bruce Hunt was one of our stars. The other teams d dn't have an\ man 
to equal him. 

Jean: Keby and Barb added their efforts with Marge and Shirley as cheerleaders to 
support the team. Topsy Dewey, Nancy Page, Evelyn Anderson, and I were 
subs. 

Dick: Remember the Hingham game? The field was almost a swamp. It was so 
wet that Weymouth had to start the second hall in old suits. 

Rai.phie: Our wrestling team was good, too. For such a little fellow, "Diver" Swan 
certainly put up a good light. 

Dick: Our track team won the Class B State Championship again. We had plent\ 
of stars: "Slim" Luscombe and Bob Dominy, both in the serv ice: together w.th 
Roger Freeman, John Donovan, and Carl MacKen/ie. 

Ralphie: Bob Dominy won every race in cross country. 

George: It seems to me the basketball team was pretty good. Don't forget Bob 
Kjellman and Bruce Hallgren played on the team. They're from Trade, you 
know. 

Jean: Everybody got a lot of enjoyment from the concert. Mr. Jack certainly did 
a wonderful job for his first year at Weymouth High. 

George: Four kids in our class at trade sang in the choir: Paul Doble, Presley Fostei . 
John McCarthy, and Darrell Smith. Well, see you later, kids! 

Jean: Oh, going down to see your girl? 

George: Silence! 

Jean: Silence is golden. (Exit, George) 

Dick: I hear the Student Council next year is really going to town. With Frank 
Aiello, Helen Andersson, Ed Caracciolo, Marge Kelly and Barbara Loud on 
the council, they ought to fetch the corner, too. 

Ralphie: I thought the seniors were pretty good to invite us on their outing. 

Dick: I wonder how many actually suffered ill effects from that ti\p to Province- 
town? 

Ralphie: How about the effects that graduation had on (he poor ushers. Frank, 
you and I suffered almost as much as the graduates; and I guess the others did, 
too. 

Page Eighteen 'XJi-' 



Jean: Gee, we did have some good Limes didn'i we? I wonder il our last year will 
be as eventful as our junioi year. 




ACT IV 

The house lights dim for the fourth and last act, the foot lights come up as 
Ed Caracciolo, president ol the .Student Council and Margie Kelly, secretary, 
step in front of the curtain. 

Ed: Well, Marge, after four years of work and worry we finally made il. 
Marge: We've really had an interesting and successful year. 

En: Our football team got off to a slow start, but did all right lor itself under 
the leadership of Paul Sweeney. 

Marge: The Thanksgiving rally was one I'll never forget. Remember Jimmie 
Casey as Ping Pong, the Chinaman? 

En: Do I! Mr. Ghiorse and Miss Toomey did a lot of work on that. 

Marge: Ed, how about giving a resume of the games. 

Ed: Curtain! Pake it away Legion Field. The band sitting in the grandstand 
strikes up "Maroon and Gold" under the masterful baton of Mr. Jack. In 
front of the stands are six drum majorettes in dazzling white uniforms led 
by Kay Madden in her maroon and gold. The cheerleaders break out in 
"The Weymouth Locomotive" led by co-head cheerleaders Margie Kelley 
and Shirley Osborn. The cheer. ng squad is going to lose five pretty nice 
members: Marge, Shirley. Barbara Loud, Helen Keblis, and Jean Keohan. 
And now the game has started. Hank Minasian centres the ball, Captain 
Bruce Hunt gets it. and he's oil lor a touchdown. Little Jimmie Covency 
comes up and tries a drop kick lor the point alter and — it's good! Now 
lake over Weymouth High. Curtain. 

Marge: Even if Weymouth was a bit slow in starting, we ended the season 
with a smashing victory over Hingham. 

Ed: Remember the .Athletic Dance, we gave in honor of the team? That was spon- 
sored by the Student Council. Don't forget. Then too our Christmas Party, 
under the direction of Miss Pearson, was a success, even though it was post- 
poned a couple of times. 

Marge: They gave a play "Why the Chimes Rang" at the Christmas Assembly, 
which really touched the heart. It was a 1 ttle different from the plays and 
rallies that have been given other years. Miss Chase directed it. 
(Enter George McKinney) 



c^V> Page Nineteen 



George: Don't forget ii was the Trade School; the) pui up the scenery loi the 
play. 

Ed: One of the senior events in Trade School was the election ol officers. Who 
are the officers, George? 

George: (blushing) Well, I — a — I'm president, 15.11 Mac Donald is vice president, 
and Bruce Hallgren is secretary-treasurer. 

Marge: My, what a modest president the Trade School lias! 

George: Say, who were the Spelling Bee Champions in your lour years at high 
school? 

Ed: Arlene Boeckel in our Freshman Year, Evelyn Newell in our Sophomore 
Year, Dorothy Perett Junior year, and Dick Whittle this last year. 

Marge: In January Mr. Jack gave a concert with the choir, band, and orchestra. 
Marge Abbott and Eleanor McCafferty helped to make it a success. The 
senior ushers looked attractive in their evening gowns. 

Ed: The Senior Play came next — "Every Family Has One.'' Ii was one of the 
best plays presented at W. H. S. The play-reading committee certainly made 
a wise choice. 

Marge: This is the first year they had a Play Reading Committee. It's a good 
idea. I hope they continue it. We certainly uncovered a lot of talent the 
night of the play. Ginnic Kaiajian certainly stole the show. And, of course 
we can't forget the job Lambie Koopman did. The whole cast was good: 
Margie Abbott, Phyllis Vachon, Carol Corridan, Helen Keblis, Betty Paul- 
son, John Pappas, Russ Shaw, Bob Karnan, Darrell Smith, and jimmie 
Casey. They all deserve a hand; but the most thanks go to Miss Chase, who 
directed it. 

George: There you go again, leavin' out about all the work Trade School 
did on the Senior Play. 

Ed: Well, don't leave out Miss Mayo: she did a lot of work on the properties. 

George: We had a few ex-servicemen start school this year. John Saferian, Alfred 
LaBrecque, and then Bill Coveney of the famous Coveney family. 

Marge: Yes, I noticed a lot of servicemen in the classes. 

George: Yuh, they noticed you, too. Well, see you later kids. 

Ed: In at the Boston Garden Captain Carleton MacKenzie and his track team 
won the State Class B Championship. They put Weymouth on the map. 
Yup, Mr. Page did it again. 

Marge: Bob Stitt, one of the track standouts, was elected class marshall right 
about then. 

Ed: For pastime the kids could go to the Canteen on Saturday nights, and then 
there was the projection club under the direction of Mr. Ghiorse. 

Marge: This year the girls had their own volley-ball teams. The varsity basket- 
ball team won laurels for themselves, being the only team to defeat Rock- 
land, State Class B Champions. 

Ed: We ended the season with six wins and eight losses. Coach Gannon missed 
a game lor the first time in his coaching career at Weymouth. 

Marge: 1 understand Coach Jim Steele had a good wrestling team this year. Led 
by Captain Dick Swan. 

Page Twenty 'X^-' 



En: The baseball team had a good season, too. Bui let's leave the subjecl of 
spoils. The Senior Prom was one ol the big events of the year and was 
really a success. 

Marge: And now we find ourselves lu re ai the finale of Weymouth High 
Follies. We'd heller gel out of our caps and gowns; we've got a lot to do. 
Tonight after the reception we'll he saying good-bye to all this. Let's say 
il in a big wax. 

Ed: O.K. I'll call the kids together. (Both exit) 

Ralph Amabile, Master ol Ceremonies. 

The curtain again goes up revealing the famous "Weymouth Rockettes" 
(cheer leaders, drum majorettes) in song and dance entitled "School Daze" with 
Shirle) Osborn, vocalist. Then a play by none other than the "Brainstormers" 
famous Broadway Group, (football team) The finale is by the "Harmony 
Chorus," world famous choirsters (Senior Class) who break out in song as the 
curtain falls on one of the most important ads of their "Comedy ol Life". 
Amid the applause, the Class of '46 says good by to all this — and now tomorrow. 




c^V> Page Twenty-one 




1. Dorice Thompson 

2. Ann Bttckman 

3. Roger Freeman 
McKenzie 

4. Mr. Lyons 

5 . Eleanor 



and Carlton 



Dottie 



Peckham, 
Perrett, and Ann Rogers 
0. Ann Rogers, Kay Smith, Bar- 
bara McFarland, and Retty Short 
7. Ho!) MacAuliffe and Margie 
Kelly 



8. Nancy Page and Shirley Osborn 

9. Front Row: Left to Right; 
Warren Cnrney, Bob Cavanaugh. 
( Jinny Watson. Barbara Ruxton, 
and Shirley Osborn 

Second Row: Lambie Koopman, 
Nancie Page, Lois Gill, and 
Jean Taber 

10. Sid Lyons 

1 1 . Ginny Watson 



12. Ralph Amabile, Marilyn Bloom, 
Joanne McKenna, and Dick Mc- 
Carthy 

13. Kay Madden 
14- Jean Taber 

15. Shirley Osborn 

t6. Trade School Entrance 

17. Cross of Gray 

1 8. Tower 

19. Shirley Osborn 



Prophecy Committee 

Kurt Konrad, Chairman 
Helen Anderson 
Robert Bouchie 
James Casey 
George Curtin 
Elizabeth Dewey 
Ann Fekkes 
Richard Gardner 
Lois Gill 
Jack Clancy Hall 
Robert Karnan 
William Henry 
Lisbeth Koopman 
Martha Nickerson 
Martha Poison 
John Ries 
Russell Shaw 
Eileen Smith 
Carolyn Strait 
Donald Whittemore 
Beverly Wright 



It was a warm spring evening. Through the window of a small house a coz) 
room could be seen. Someone was leaning over the desk at which he had been 
studying. It was Kurt Konrad, asleep. 

He stirred; (hen he stood up. Walking as il in a da/e, he 1 weni to the window, 
threw il open, and started chanting: 

"Spirit, white and fleet v, 
Spirit of the powerf ul Apollo, 
Attend me; lielp me to pred ct 
The happenings of tommorrow." 

Alter he had repeated this several times, the form of a handsome youth 
materialized before the window. 

"What is it that you wish from me, 
Spirit of the god of prophecy?" 

Then Kurt explained that the work of the members of the Prophecy Com- 
mittee, of which he was chairman, was to predict the future of their classmates. 
Because of this, he had thought the Spirit might help and had appealed to him. 

"I will do all I can for you. Follow me into the future," whispered the Spirit, 
"and I will point out what will be happening ten years from now." Carefully 
the Spirit led the way through the years to come. Soon he stopped and pointed. 

"This is 1956," he declared. "Whom do you wish to visit first?" 

As Kurt mentioned the name of each member of Weymouth High's grad- 
uating class of 1946, the Spirit showed him what that person was doing. 

When Kurt returned to the present, he hurriedly called a meeting of the 
Prophecy Committee and made this report: 



MAR JORIE ABBOTT 

Margie can now be seen in a New York radio 
studio, singing witli one of the big name bands 
of the year. 

FRANK AIELLO 

Fiank is now an usher in the Jasan Theatre. 
His usual smile and amiability are bringing him 
profit, for the tips are high. 

DONALD ALLEN 

Don is working on a tug boat as a Diesel 
engineer. 

RALPH AMABILE 

Senator Amabile has just proposed a bill to the 
House. Always a favorite with his party, he is 
being considered as a candidate for the Presi- 
dency. Fame has not gone to his head, for he 
still speaks to everyone, whether he knows him 
or not. 

EVELY N ANDERSON 

All the young high-school group are buying 
their corsarges at "Evie's", the florist shop on the 
corner. 

VIRGINIA ANDERSON 

Virginia is now writing short stories every 
month in the Woman's Home Companion. 

HELEN ANDERSSON 

Helen is now a Congresswoman. Her latest 
husband is Admiral Schwartz. Happy sailing, 
Helen! 



DOROTHEA ANDRIAN 

Living in South Weymouth has made Dot 
realize how hard it is to travel. She recently pur- 
chased a helicopter and the Lovcll Buses have 
lost a passenger. 

MARY BACCHIERI 

Mary is now the owner of a beauty salon in 
Bicknell Square. The North Weymouth girls are 
helping business to uphold the reputation of 
the best "stock" in town. 

MARY BATCHELDER 

Betty has married the man of her dreams and 
lives in Arizona. 

DOROTHY BEAZLEY 

Operator sn is heard by hundreds of people 
every day. In case you didn't know it, the soft, 
pleasant voice that says "Number, please?" on the 
other end of your telephone line is none other 
than Dot. 

NORMA BEDFORD 

Norma is now a secretary for a World War II 
veteran. It is said he is a sailor. She and her boss 
are contemplating marriage. 

HERMAN BENEDICT 

Herman is now one of the finest engineers in 
the business. Having just finished a trans-oceanic 
railwav bridge, he is busily engaged in building 
a tunnel to the North Pole. 



c^V, Page Twenty-five 



LOUISE BIANCO 

A new professional dancer is now being talked 
aboul in all the movie columns foi her grace- 
fulness. She is none othei than "our" Louise. 

ROSE BIANCO 

Rose has had quite a difficult time trying to 
decide which suitoi slie should marry, but she 
has finally made the i ighl ( hoice. 

HOPE BILLARD 

Hope is now married. Dining hei spare time 
she ma) be seen in hei Quincy studio writing a 
book entitled The Art of Football. 

ROBERT BOUCHIE 

Bob joined the Navy and has .1 rating as a metal 
smith. He says that he is going to be a "career" 
man. 

JAMES BOUDREAU 

fim has just been promoted to head pretzel 
bender in the Ginsburg Pretzel Company. Happv 
"bending", Jim! 

HENRY BOUTILIER 

Henry has decided that it is about time thai 
men's clothes should be rated as important as 
women's. He has just opened a fashionable men's 
store — "Henri's"— on Fifth Avenue. 

JOHN BRADY 

Jack is now star ca teller of the Boston Red 
Sox. Recently voted the most promising Rookii 
ol 1950, he is becoming a favorite with the fans. 

[AMES BRAVSHAW 

fim is now the head librarian at the Tufts 
Library. Eager to please and deeply interested 
in his work, he is consulted by noted authors and 
historians. His leisure hours arc usually spent 
reading. 

JOHN BROCKLESBY 

|ohn is now driving a bus lor the Eastern 
Mass. Don't take any wooden nickels, John. 

PAUL BUCHAN 

Shovelling coal for the engineer of the crack 
Indian Chiel Railroad keeps Paul very busy these 
days. His pay is high and enough to take caie 
of all the little ones. 

ANN BUCKMAN 

Ann has just returned from making a nip 
around the world. It it weren't for hei knowledge 
of French and German, she never would have 
made it. 

MARY BUDD 

Mary is now the assistant buyer tor Jordan 
Marsh. 

NATALIE BUTLER 

Natalie is running her own dress shop in 
Weymouth. She always did keep us in stitches. 

ALBERT CAIN 

Cain's Service Station. Inc. has just opened a 
new garage. The proud owner has fourteen 
blanches in his glowing business. At present 
he is busy Inc. iking in .1 new mechanic, who we've 
heard is called AI. Jr. 



EDMUND CARACCIOI.O 

special investigator 591, Eddie Caracciolo of 
the F.B.I., is now tracking down the- ferocious 
peroxide murderess. 

MAIM CARIST] 

Elaine is private secretary in a huge Boston 
In m 

JEAN CARR 

Jean is now a nurse at the South Shore 
Hospital. Patients show rapid improvement with 
jean around. 

ROB1 R I CARTER 

Super-Special fnvestigatoi Bob Cartel is busy 
nailing Investigator 591 to see thai he keeps on 
the job and away from the murderous blond. 

JAMES CASEY 

Every Tuesday night at ten o'clock, instead of 
Bob Hope, we- heai Jimmy and his sensational 
comedy show. Jimmy was voted the favorite 
comedian of 1955. 

LAWRENCE CASSESE 

Happily settled on the X-Bai X Ranch is the 
Cassese family. Besides Ml. and Mis. Casscsc, 
there are twenty other Casseses. His hobbies are 
lishing and hunting. 

C \ROI CHAMBERS 

Carol is employed by the United Air Lines as a 
hostess. Hei sparkling eyes and friendly smile 
win the hearts of all the pilots. 

JEAN CHASE 

Jean is now giving swimming lessons at Whit- 
man's Pond. 

FLORINE CHISHOLM 

"Chick" is now head floor nurse at the \Ve\- 
mouth Hospital, and her patients don't mind it 
at all. 

ANN CLAFLLN 

"Nancy" is now private secretary for an oil 
magnate, and she must be doing very well. (Have 
you seen the new ring she's wearing?) 

FREDERICK CLAIN 

Fred is the proprietor of the Hingham Bowling 
\llevs. The knowledge acquired in the cabinet- 
making course is being utilized in turning out 
new howling pins. 

ELIZABETH CLARK 

Betty is now one of the most famous movie act 
resses. She was chosen in a nation-wide contest 
because of .her dancing ability. 

ALEXANDER CLAWSON 

Alec is now general foreman at the woolen 
mill. As a sideline, he raises pigs. 

SHIRLEY COLE 

Shir! has reached greal heights since leaving 
Weymouth High. She is teaching typewriting at 
.1 noted finishing school for girls. 



Page Twenty-six *\5^? 



GEORGE COLEMAN 

George has l>ecn established I'oi (he past lew 
years as head mechanical engineer Eoi a large 
con:racting firm. His latest achievement is his 
work in conjunction with the new South Wej 
mouth Airport. 

fOSEPH CONCANNON 

foe has been Hacking jokes Cor the past three 
years and has finally hit one that is funny. 

ANN CONNOLLY 

Ann has bought out Hearn's Drug Company 
and now lias a chain of ding stoies Erom Boston 
to Chicago. 

WALTER COOK 

Walter is now manager of the Cameo Theatre 
at South Weymouth. (Quite a jump from the 
days when he was usher.) 

PHILIP COPE 

Phil has just been assigned aeronautical 
mechanic at the Boston Airport. It is well to 
note that Phil has been climbing the ladder of 
success very rapidly. 

MARTHA COREY 

Martha is now a shorthand teacher at Kathleen 
Dell. 

CAROLYN CORRIDAN 

Carol has now replaced Lily Pons as the out- 
standing soprano of the Metropolitan Opera 
Company. 

MARY CORRDIAN 

Yes, that leading lady in the latest dramatic 
hit is none other than Mary. Her performance as 
Lady Macbeth was so real that the theatre-going 
public is demanding her arrest for murder. 

WILLIAM COVENEY 

Bill, who said that Trade School was a lot easier 
than army life in the Pacific, is working on sheet 
metal contracts for the U. S. Army. 

JOHN COYLE 

John has risen to great heights since he left 
Weymouth High. He is now private secretary 
to the President. 

VIRGINIA CRAWFORD 

Ginny has boosted the world's typing record 
two hundred words a minute. The Crawford 
I'vping Certificate; boring Virginias personal 
signature, is replacing the Gregg Typing Certifi- 
cate. 

RICHARD CRONIN 

Dick has completed his engineering course at 
Northeastern. He is now burning the midnight 
oil working on plans for a four lane bridge across 
Whitman's Pond. 

JEAN CROSS 

Jean is owner of the Deluxe Ice Cream Shoppe 
in Lincoln Square. Have you tried the "Cross 
Special"? 



| VMES CURLEY 

Jimmy is now a gentleman fai tner and ownei ol 
an extensive farm. He has moved from his be- 
loved Hingham i<> the wilds of Alaska. 

GEORGE CURTIN 

George's new position as aeronautical engineei 
at the Weymouth Airport keeps him so busy thai 
he has no longei has lime for the women. 

DOUGLAS DADEAU 

Doug is the darling test pilot thai you've been 
hearing so much about. His next lea I is lo fly the 
"Sun Streak,'' the new super rocket, to the sun. 
Hope he makes it. 

GILBERT DALEY 

Cil now owns a flourishing Swedish Bakery, 
specializing in birthday and wedding cakes 
elaborately decorated. The charming little count- 
er girl is his wife. 

JAMES DELOREY 

If your flat iron is on the "blink" or nothing 
comes out of your radio, take them to "Jimmy's 
Electrical Shop." Jimmy now has a fine business 
built up with the aid of the knowledge obtained 
as an electrician's mate in the Navy. 

ALAN DEWEY 

The pupils at Weymouth High are having a 
hard time with geography these days. They have 
a new teacher, Mr. Dewey, who believes that 
(and I quote) "Geography is an important sub- 
ject and should be learned thoroughly." 

ELIZABETH DEWEY 

"Topsy" is a very well-known authoress. Her 
famous "Homer Ingall" series is being published 
in Collier's. 

JOSEPH DILLON 

Joe is going into business for himself after he 
comes back from his "hitch" in the Navy. Wonder 
who the girl is that's keeping the home fires burn- 
ing? 

PHYLLIS DOANE 

Phyl has finished her training as an occupa- 
tional therapist. She is very efficient in her chosen 
field. 

PAUL DOBLE 

Paul has changed from cabinetmaking to car- 
pentry and roofing. He may be seen on a Wey- 
mouth housetop, showing "the boys" how to 
nail down a tool. 

NEIL DOHERTY 

Girls, if your nerves are on edge and you think 
you're seeing things when you're really not, go 
to Neil Doherty, the handsome psychiatrist. 

1 HOMAS DONOVAN 

Tommy has become famous as the world's 
greatest wrestler. He is now known by the name 
"Timberwolf Tommy." 

DONALD DuVAL 

Donald is now I he head of the DuVal's Beauty 
Salon. Inc. All the women are coming to see 
Don. ild — not just to get their hair done. 



c^Sl> Page Twenty-'Seven 



JOHN EG AN 

John is now head district salesman Eoi the 
Lucky Stuck Company, the LS/MF1 (leaping 
sales mean liner trucks) for John's district. 

MELVIN ELLIS 

Mel lias been practising the art of printing 
and hopes to get the position ol layout man foi 
Life magazine. 

HERBERT EMILSON 

Herb is now owner of the famous "Lobstei 
Claw," a fashionable restaurant on the South 
Shore. 

FRANK I.VERTON 

f rank is now photographing beautiu] models 
lor Esquire. 1 hear he's very much interested in 
his vvoi k. 

PEARL FARGO 

Pearl is an efficient secretary to the president 
of a well known insurance company. By the way, 
gills, take note of the cievei way she weais he) 
braids. 

DORO f HV EEKK.ES 

Ann has just finished her college training as 
school teacher. She is soon to start lor the lonel) 
but beautiful West, where she hopes to teach. 

FELICE FERGUSON 

Felice is now a dashing journalist. She nevei 
misses the latest news — it doesn't matter what 
the subject is. 

PRESLEY FOSTER 

"Tres" has his own woodworking shop in Pond 
Plain and is teaching the little fosters the Hade. 

ROGER FREEMAN 

Roger has taken life easy since graduating from 
school. He is now owner of the largest poultry 
farm this side of the Mississijjpi Rivet . However, 
he hasn't forgotten that he was once a prominent 
track star of W. H. S., because he runs about .111. 1 
delivers his farm jnoducts with great speed. 

CONSTANCE FRYER 

Connie has made use ol her business knowledge 
obtained at Weymouth High. She is now a 
private secretary. 

MAE EURBtSH 

Mae is now head buyer in the dress depatment 
at Gilchrist's. 

RICHARD GARDNER 

Dick has just won the Nobel Prize lor harness- 
ing atomic power. In his dramatic statement he 
said, " The rocket ship is no longer a thing ol the 
future." 

RtTA GAROFALO 

Everyone said that Rita would go far in the 
business world. Right now she is making a better 
wile than secretary. 

AUDRY GARS1DE 

"And" has become air minded since her days 
at VV. H. S. She is now studying to be head in- 
structoi at a private airfield. Docs anyone 
know who the handsome owner is? 



LOIS GILL 

Lois is a popular girl with the fellows ai the 
Veterans' Hospital, where she is a very efficient 
o< < upational therapist. 

ROBER1 GILLIGAN 

Hob is the inventor of the Automatic type 
writer, which operates at the press of a button. 
Vfter many hours of "blood, sweat, and tears" 
in the type room ai Weymouth High, back in 
ii||<>. Bob decided to devote his hie 10 this great 
cause, with the hope of cutting down the suicide 
1 ale of discouraged typists. 

RICHARD GOULD 

"Gasper" is back at W. H. s. coaching the 
football team. We hear that he makes the boys 
11111 lilt) laps lor breaking training. 

MIRIAM GOURLEY 

Whenever you see a beautiful lull page 
illustration in your favorite magazine, look foi 
the artist's name. Most likely it will be Miriam s. 
I01 she is one ol the top-notch illustrators 111 
the magazine uoi Id. 

PHILIP GRASSO 

"Zeke" is running a night dub now. lies 
packing them in with his witty humor. 

ALLAN HAAS 

Allan now inns the Haas Poultry Farm. I[ is 
certainly a big jump since his days at Weymouth 
High School. 

GERALD HACKETT 

"Speak" is the owner of the Hacked Mouse- 
Ira]} Manufacturing Company. His mono is 
"We tease 'em, then squeeze em"! 

MARY HAiLSTONE 

"Bunty" has opened a gift shop, where she- 
sells hand made jewelry, gadgets, and knit goods. 
In hei spare moments she acts in amateui plays, 
where her giggle is well known. 

JACK HALL 

Jack has his own shop in Hingham and is mak- 
ing a lot of children happy. 

BRUCE HALLGREN 

Due to his exceptional height and broad 
shoulders, "Tress" is one of the "biggest" pi inters 
in Boston. He is a linotype operator lor the 
Boston Globe. 

HERBERT HANSEN 

Herb is now sole proprietor ol Herb s (you 
name it — we never heard of it) Meat Market. 
All his former classmates trade with him, for 
they all know that Herb is dependable. 

WALTER HANSEN 

Willie is now playing basketball lor the Abing- 
ton All Stars. 

JACQUELINE HANSON 

Jackie is back at W. H. S. in charge of the 
Office Practice Room. She gets quite a kick out 
ol the telephones. 



Page Twenty-eight 



PATRICIA HARKIN 

Patricia has moved to Hollywood to do dress 
designing for MGM. She has designed sonic 
snappy numbers. 

KM I) HAYES 

Enid's is the familiar face on those studeal 
toothpaste ads. Her winning smile will encour- 
age thousands of men to buy "Dr. Bonamonamo's 
Toothpaste". 

JOHN HEALY 

John doesn't pay any attention to speed limits 
any more. Could it be because he's driving a 
i>ig red die engine? 

[RENE HEAVER 

Irene is the author of the gossip column in the 
Weymouth Gazette. Old classmates will be 
pleased to know that the quiet and demure girl 
ol the good old days at Weymouth has actually 
begun to talk. 

WILLIAM HENRY 

Bill followed his main ambition and became a 
hairuresser. He does women's hair as well as 
his own. 

EVELYN HERRICK 

Evelyn is private secretary to a banker. We 
hear they see a lot of each other alter ollice 
hours. 

HELEN HILLIARD 

Helen is working lor a huge firm in Boston 
where she won the title of "Miss Mimeograph ot 
1955." She says she owes her success to the daily 
uaining at W. H. S. 

HAZEL HOLBROOK 

Hazel is happily married to a sucessful banker 
— or maybe it's Hilda. (We still can't tell them 
apart!) 

HILDA HOLBROOK 

Hilda is now a school teacher, but then again, 
mas be it's Hazel. Ah, well — confusing, but 
amusing. 

RAYMOND HOLBROOK 

Ray has attained fame and publicity in the 
world of sports, but he is still content to be the 
nhysical education instructor at Weymouth High 
School. 

I S [ HER HOSMER 

"Tillie" is private secretary and receptionist 
for Dr. Ima Cutter in the Little Building. She did 
very well at Weymouth High School. 

CARLTON HULTEEN 

Carl is the owner of the Hulteen Air Lines. 
After a successful career above the clouds. Carl 
intends to settle down to terra firma with his 
blushing bride in their little cottage in South 
Weymouth. 



ELINOR HUMPREY 

Elinor is a well-known dancing teachei in New 
York City. She has changed he: name to "Madame 
HumphreV' In her spare hours she can be found 
in the quiet atmosphere of her apartment 011 
Park Avenue tending to her eight children. 

BRUCE HUNT 

Bruce is playing football £01 the Chicago Bears 
and continues to burn up the gridiron as he did 
at W. H. S. 

BARBARA HUSBAND 

"Barbie" is working in a publisher's house, 
where she does secretarial work tor one of the 
editors. She also finds time to do a little writing 
of her own, 

RALPH JACKSON 

The government has finally recognized Ralph's 
good work in the Weymouth Post Office ana uas 
appointed him Postmaster General. 

WILLIAM JACOBS 

"Jake" is operating the Weymouth Theatre in 
partnership with John McCarthy. It is rumored 
that he will soon open a Hying school in the 
"wilds" of South Weymouth. 

ARTHUR JONES 

Arthur has been coaching the Boston Bruins 
for several seasons now. He got his training in 
the Weymouth Hockey League. 

ALVAN KAISER 

After many years of hard work, Al finally found 
his main ambition — loafing. 

VIRGINIA KALAJIAN 

"Ginny" is on the stage in New York. She is 
appearing in that long-run success, "Bloomer 
(»iil.' A new fad is on its way! 

ROBERT KARNAN 

Bob is touring the country giving piano con 
certs prior to the start of his next musical pro 
duction for MGM. 

ROBERT KARSTUNEN 

"Kit" is now playing goalie for the Boston 
Bruins. 

HELEN KEBLIS 

"Keby" is the star of the Screen Guild Theater 
heard every Wednesday night over CBS. She has 
a large following. 

MARGARET KELLY 

Margie was chosen the "Nurse of the- Year" in 
a recent contest. The South Shore Hospital, 
where she now works, is proud of her. 

S HER LEY KEMP 

Come to Kemp's for your next dancing lesson. 
Shirley specializes in rhumba, tap, ballet, and 
apache dances. To her toe-crushing classmates, 
Shirley extends a cordial welcome. 

[EAN KEOHAN 

[ean has combined her love for horses and 
art. She is now one of the nation's leading illus- 
trators of horses. 



c^SV, Page Twenty'tiine 



LOIS KERR 

Lois is the second Mary Hay worth of the 

Boston Herald, and will be acclaimed Eoj hei 
helpful advice to love-lorn wives. 

BARBARA KILBURN 

■ Barb" has finally completed "that book". She 
also continues her hobby <>l amateui tattooing. 
She has many designs, but hands are still her 
favorite subject. 

KURT KONRAD 

Km t is the projection-machine operator at 
R.nlio City Music Hall. In his spare time he can 
be found talking to the Rockettes. 

LISBETH KOOPMAN 

"Lamie" certainly knows how to draw those 
latest styles for "Mademoiselle." She does dress 
designing on the side, please note, girls. 

BARBARA KUPLAS I 

• Barb" is now the owner of a chain of movie 
houses all over the country. Her motto is "The 
newest and best presented by Kuplast." Old class 
mates are admitted with the compliments of the 
owner. 

ROBERT LANEAU 

Bob is the inventor of the famous rocket car to 
Mars and offers a round trip free to any man who 
can survive the first trip. Alter his marriage to a 
famous star, he will make his permanent residence 
at iG Planet Street, Mars. 

FILOMENA LaROCCO 

•'Fil" got such a kick out of Latin that she's 
li.uk at W. H. S. leaching her favorite language. 
The pupils are beginning to like "Ceasar." 

PHYLLIS LARSON 

The friendly voice you hear saying "Numbei 
please?" when you pick up the telephone receivei 
could be "Ph) I s." She is a very popular telephone 
operator now. 

LEONARD LASKEY 

Lieutenant Laskey is certainly an asset to the 
United States Navy. He says he owes his pro 
motions to the training he received at Weymouth 
High. 

VERONICA LEE 

Ronnie now has her own dancing school in 
Quincy. She is starting many young girls on the 
load to dancing success. 

MADELINE LELYVELD 

Madeline is now taking notes for a very im- 
portant New York business man. He says he never 
had a better secretary. 

VIRGINIA LEVA AS 

Virginia is very important to the workings of 
the South Shore Hospital. She is personal sec- 
retary to the head surgeon. 

ROB! R I LINDQUIST 

Bob is still packing his Model A Ford with 
women. 



BARBARA LOUD 

An school days have helped "Barb" decorate 
her new home. By the way. it is featured ill 
"Better Homes and Gardens" this month. 

ELEANOR LOUD 

I lly" can be found five days a week in Wey- 
mouth High's Cafeteria. Everyone praises the 
good lunches she serves as the new directress. 

f OHN LYNCH 

|olni owns his own automobile repair garage 
in North Weymouth. 

ROBER1 LYONS 

"Sid" is the head of Harvard's Mathematics 
Department. He is a great favorite with both 
his fellow professors and students. 

WILLIAM MacDONALD 

Mac has finally decided to do his hunting in 
season and has accepted a position as the local 
game warden. Mac knows all the tricks 
"poachers" use. 

CHES 1 ER IVIacKI NZIE 

Chet never could find his main ambition; so, 
as usual, he is still loafing. 

IS \ BELLE MacKENZIE 

"Izzy" just couldn't keep away from Wey- 
mouth High. You can find her in Mr. Whittle'-: 
ollice five days a week as his secretary. 

KATHRYN MADDEN 

Kay has finally reached the top of her am 
bitions. She can now be heard nightly at the 
Stork Club. 

SARA MA PES 

Sally is personnel manager at Macy's Depart- 
ment store in New York. She meets many in- 
teresting and amusing people. 

ELAINE MARIN 

Elaine is now a dress designer at M-G-M. It 
is rumored that she has special designs on a 
i ri lain producer. 

ALAN MASISON 

Alan has one of the most envied jobs in the 
Army Air Corps. He is instructor at a large air- 
field where the Air Wacs receive their first flight 
training. 

CHARLES MASISON 

Charlie has succeeded his father in the garage 
business. He has enlarged upon it until he now 
owns a total of fifty garages spread across New 
England. 

VIRGINIA MATTSON 

"Ginny" is a supervisor at a well-known 
Children's Hospital. No one could be doing a 
better Job. 

ROBER1 Mc AIT II I I- 

Bob and his band arc just stalling work on 
a new picture. McAuliffe Ian Clubs have sprung 
lip all over the nation. 



Page Thirty 



ELEANOR McCAFFERTY 

Eleanor has had many leading parts in the 
Metropolitan Opera Company and is ;ii present 
planning ;i European concert tour. 

john McCarthy 

Mac is pan owner of the Weymouth Theatre 
and plans to establish a chain of movie houses. 

paul McCarthy 

Paul lias been heralded as top drummer in 
the nation. Fans clamoi for his autograph alter 
each of his weekly radio broadcasts. 

richard McCarthy 

l)i<k is Paramount's great new find. Aftei 
his Inst success, he has begun work on his next 
picture. 

BARBARA MdARLAND 

Barbara is editor of the "Boston Globe's" 
Women's Page. She has acquired the reputation 
of being Boston's most fashionable woman. 

dorothv Mcintosh 

Yes, that odor of burnt toast will lead you to 
Oshkosh High School, where Dotty, teaching 
Home Economics, is vainly trying to put over the 
fact that it isn't really hard to poach an egg. 

marii yn Mcintosh 

"Mai" is a surgical nurse at the Massachusetts 
General Hospital. Because of her efficiency , 
"Mai" is frequently called upon to assist at major 
operations. 

JOHN McKENNA 

Mac is married now and has a family. He is 
working as a stone cutter in the quarries. 

CARL I ON McKENZIE 

Carl has just established a new record in the 
Marathon Race He now holds the title of 
Olympic Champion. 

GEORGE McKINNEY 

"Toby" is now president of the Sheet Metal 
Workers' Union at Fore River Shipyard. 

WALTER McWILLIAMS 

Mac is now the featured singer with Louis 
Prima. 

MARY MERTON 

Mary graduated from medical school with high 
honors. She is now chief pediatrician at the 
Children's Hospital in Boston. 

ANN MICHALSKI 

Ann is superintendent of nurses at Boston 
City Hospital. Nurses young and old come to 
her for advice and help. 

PAULINE MILLER 

Polly has just finished her secretarial training 
at Chandler Secretarial School. She can be seen 
practically any time of the day taking notes. I 
wonder what subject it's on? 

HENRY MINASIAN 

Hank is now mechanical drawing teacher at 
good old Weymouth High School. He's order- 
ing his pupils around just as his teachers used 
to order him around. 



PHYLLIS Mi ll LE 

Phyl is now writing an ides lor Vogue. She- 
ll. is almost finished a hook of her poems, whicli 
is sure to become a certain suuess from all re- 
ports. 

KIWI I H MYER 

Kenny has made a new round the World speed 

record. His lame as an aviator is universally 
known. 

RICHARD NEARY 

Dick has just purchased a large ranch in 
I c\as. His many head of cattle and his 
thoroughbred horses keep him pretty busy. U 
didn't take him long to acquire the Texan 
twang. 

FRANCIS NEWCOMB 

Fran has hung out his M.D. shingle in Wey- 
mouth. His practice is increasing by leaps and 
hounds, and many of his patients are former 
i lassmates. 

EVELYN NEWELL 

Evelyn's latest novel "No Justice," has just 
been acclaimed the book-of-the-month. It con- 
tains descriptions of many of her former class- 
mates. 

MARTHA NICKERSON 

Betty, the mathematical genius, is head of the 
Bureau of Vital Statistics in Washington. As a 
sideline, she is writing "Nickerson's Theory of 
Relativity." Tough luck on Einstein. 

VIRGINIA NORRIS 

Virginia is making use of her business training 
obtained at Weymouth High School. She is a 
typist for a paper concern in Boston. 

RICHARD O'BRIEN 

"Obie" now drives a truck for the Quincy Post 
Office. He has the Weymouth route and at 
Christmas time you may see him up at his old 
alma mater urging the students to make up their 
school work in order to work on the mail durin** 
the Christmas season. 

CATHERINE OLIVA 

Kay is now "chief cook and bottle washer" 
in her cute Cape Cod house on Mount Vernon 
Road. 

MARGARET O'NEIL 

Peggy is married to an ex-Navy man and is 
now raising a small "fleet" of her own. 

SHIR KEY OSBORN 

Shirley is heard from coast to coast on a well- 
known concert program as the star singer. 

NANCY PAGE 

Nancy has just been made the assistant editor 
of a new fashion magazine. Her experience at 
Weymouth High School has proved valuable. 

JOHN PAPPAS 

Johnny is a Shakespearean actor, famous in 
England as well as in the United Stales lor his 
superb performances in roles such as Prospero 
in "The Tempest." 



c^SVj Page Thirty-one 



JOHN PARSONS 

[a-ck urns his own garage and looks forward 

to the das when he can sit back and let the 

'"boys" lake over. 

I 1.1/ \ BE 1 H PAULSON 

Ileus has now heroine director and producer 
ol the famous all girl C.lee Club radio show pre- 
sented on Sunday afternoons. She herself is the 
feature attraction as pianist. 

VIRGINIA PEARSON 

At lasi Ginnie's desire has been fulfilled. She 
has jusi recently become the charming secretary 
ol Senator Saltonstall. 

ELEANOR PECKHAM 

Eleanor has charge of the "small women's" 
department of a leading fashion store. She has 
die ability :o "talk" her customers into anything. 

JOHN PECORARO 

Have son noticed the new shortstop for the 
Brooklyn Dodgers? Yes, that's Johnny. After his 
notable high school baseball record, we know 
that |ohnny will be in the hall of fame some day. 

JOSEPH PEPE 

Joe is the president of the "Pepe Press and 
Broadcasting Company," a unique combination. 
He liked printing but he couldn't get away from 
talking. 

IKIRO 1 H\ PERETT 

Those eccentric gowns that have been advert- 
ised in Mademoiselle are the fabulous creations 
ol Dorothy Perett. Dottie just recently went 
into partnership with Adrian of Holl)wood. 

JEANNE PERROW 

Jean is now Miss Canning's rival. She is teach- 
ing French in room 215, where the walls are so 
thin. 

HELOISE PIKE 

"Weesie" is making use ol her four years of 
Latin b\ teaching at an exclusive girls' school 
in New York City. 

MAR I HA POLSON 

Maltha is the editoi ol a lovelorn column in 
the Ledger. You nevei can tell about the quiet 
girls, can you? 

BARBARA PRATT 

Barbara can now he seen industriously work- 
ing in a large New York office. She is the boss's 
private secretary, no less. 

SHIRLEY PRATT 

Shirley is the world's famous tightrope walker. 
I lapp) lauding. Shirley! 

GENE\ I EVE RAUCH 

I hose transcontinental flights of the Clipper 
Air Line are certainly most enjoyable since 
"Genny" has become the serenading aviatrix of 
the company. 

PHYLLIS RAYMOND 

Phyllis is now liv ing on Hones moon Lane in 
.1 little while Cape Cod house with her nasal 
husband and theii cocker spaniel, "Sailor." 



JOHN REID 

John is the prominent and energetic \i<< 
president and trust officer ol the Granite liusi 
— the apple ol President Martin's eye. 

MARGARE I RLI1W 

No wonder there are so man) young men 
studying aviation. Margaret is the new head 
airline hostess of the American Air Lines Cor- 
poi at ion. 

VIRIGINIA RENNIE 

I hose palpitating govs us modeled by Chryl 
Crane, daughtei ol the once famous Lana ["urner, 
in her latest movie, "Stranger from Heaven," are 
the newest creations of that famous designer, 
Virginia Rennie. 

SHIRLEY RIDEOI I 

Shii ley is Manual Training leather in the Wey 
mouth School system, but rumoi has n thai mh 1 
is soon to lease her home .ossn for a position as 
as supervisoi in Boston. 

JOHN RIES 

Jack is secretary-treasure) ol Hackett's Mouse 
trap Co. No, he hasn't sold the 1 1 u< k yet. He often 
delivers die compans wares with it. 

DONALD ROBERTS 

Don owns a wheat farm in Kansas. Experts call 
it the "lies; in the West." 

1 LI/A I5f I H ROBERTS 

Betts is now a clerk at Saks' Fifth Avenue. 
I here has recently been a lise in the iiiimbci ol 
male customers. 

AR I HER ROBINSON 

Arthur is South Weymouth's Iannis doctor. 
Di. Robinson, who has his office at his new icsi- 
dence 011 Pond Street, is also a deer hunter ol 
some note. 

PA I RICK ROBINSON 

Pal has jus: been promoted to captain lor his 
tine occupational work in Germany. 

MARGARET ROCKW'OOD 

Margaret is now working in ladio. She' s the girl 
thai siaits the musical "ads." Well, .someone has 
to do ii — or does she? 

ANN ROGERS 

Altei her "stretch" .it the Hacked Company 
under Mr. Rics. she is nosv a Nass svile. 

WALTER ROW ELL 

"Wall" is now a nationally known humorist 
and alter dinner speaker. Some of his writtings 
have been compared to those ol Mark Twain. 
His latest book. "Conquest ol Boston Common,'' 
is a lust seller all osei the country. 

JOHN SAFERIAN 

(ohnns is now printing "St. us and Stripes" foi 
the Arms. He says that he owes his success to the 
Printing Department at the Weymouth Vocation- 
al School. 

DI W 1 SAN I VCROCE 

Ih'wcs has become the popular coach 01 
l ulls' now unbeatable lootball team. 



Page Thirty'two 



GEORGE SARGENT 

George lias opened a garage <>n Quinq Ave 
iiiu- ne. ii Fore River. His "lubritorium" is one 
of the Imesi on the South Shore. 

VIRGINIA SCIOSCIA 

Virginia followed the footsteps of hei Eathei 
she is now running a Eashionable dressmaking 
shop in |ackson Square. 

RUSSELL SHAW 

Knss now has a marvellous job as a Foresl 
Ranger. He is responsible for the care ol the 
wild life at one ol our big national parks. 

ROBERT SHEPHERD 

Bob has been travelling for Uncle Sam the 
past few years. He now plans a more leisure!) 
existence. He'll draw plans for others alter his 
training at Wentworth. 

ELIZABETH SHORT 

Beits can now he found in the art department 
of a well-known advertising firm. 

HARRY SLOAT 

Harry is still serving his time as a twenty-year 
man in the Navy. 

DARRELL SMITH 

"Reds'' lifelong ambition has been realized. 
He is now driving "Engine 5" for the Weymouth 
Fire Department. In his spare time, he makes 
novelties of wood. 

EILEEN SMI! H 

"Smitty's" past experience with Paine's Fur- 
niture Company has aided her in doing :t 
marvelous job in that three hundred year old 
house which she and her husband recently 
purchased. 

I ESSIE SMITH 

Jessie is private secretary to Mr. Reid at the 
Granite Trust. Her excellent experience in Mr. 
Lyons' office makes her tops. 

KATHRYN SMITH 

Kay is a Katherine Gibbs graduate and now 
has an excellent position as private secretary to 
a Boston banker. 

ARTHUR SPRAGUE 

"Buster'' is a Hollvwood radio announce) 
broadcasting weekly over a coast-to-coast net- 
work. He is still interested iir horses, and it is 
rumored that he is often seen with Margaret 
O'Brien at the Agua Caliente track. 

LUCIA STAGLIOLA 

"Chick'' is a graduate of the Massachusetts 
General Hospital. She expects to become super- 
intendent of nurses there soon. 

1) A\ 11) STEPHENSON 

Dave, having graduated with high honors 
from Northeastern University, is now a math 
teacher at Weymouth High School. His pupils 
think that he is a line teacher, particularly 
when he tells them about the "good old days" 
at Weymouth High. 



JEAN si EVENS 

"Stevie" is a social uoikri in China. Her 
work hiings comfort and happiness to mans 
people. 

ROBER I SIM I 

Boh has just finished a Eoui yeai course in 
chemistry at the University ol Maine, lie is now 
a lop note h chemist, working loi Howe and 
French, Inc.. in the old home town. His loving 
wife lakes an inventory of his lingers each night 
to he sure that none have been hlown oil. 

DONALD S I . PETER 

Having graduated from Burden College, 
Don is the office manager at the East Weymouth 
Wool Scouring Company. His secretary thinks 
that he is wonderful. 

CAROLYN STRAIT 

Carolyn is an efficient secretary and plans to 
mairv her handsome boss in the very near 
Inline'. 

GRACE SULLIVAN 

Until her serviceman returns, "Gracie's" 
c heel I11I voice will he heard saving "Number, 
please?" over the local exchange. 

RICHARD SWAN 

After Irving every known brand of hair tonic 
and finding none which suited him, Dick has 
Iniallv gone into the business himself. He has 
established the Swan Manufacturing Company, 
sole distributors of "Swanee Hair Tonic, the 
Prescription for Your Hair." As for wrestling, 
some of his friends believe that Dick is the 
"Scarlet Hood." who wrestles in the Boston Arena 
every month and who is yet to be defeated. 

GLORIA SWANSON 

Gloria has followed in the footsteps of anothei 
Gloria, and is now a famous Broadway star. 

DONALD SYBERTZ 

Don is now the best shortstop in the American 
League. His pictures have appeared in every 
paper in the country and he certainly looks 
"Snappy" in his "sharp" Red Sox uniform. He 
is the "pride and joy" of the Boston fans and 
is leading the Red Sox to their first pennant in 
years. 

(KAN IABER 

While waiting tor her marine to come home. 
Jean is studying hard to become an efficient 
denial hvgienist. 

PA' I RICIA TAYLOR 

Pat is known the world over for her daring 
feats performed on roller skates. 

RICHARD TAYLOR 

Dick now has a dairy farm of his own in 
Vermont. He has at least eighty head of cattle 
and supplies Weymouth High School with 
Grade-A milk so that the home-town bovs will 
get some wholesome milk lor a change. 



c^V> Page Thirty'three 



DORICE THOMPSON 

Dorice now holds an important secretarial 
position with the First National Bank in Boston. 
It seems that her employer has a bit of trouhle 
trying to keep her, since many rival In ms ha\r 
their eyes on that "cute little blonde." 

RITA TIGHE 

Rita is known the world over for her marvel- 
ous juggling acts. 

NORMAN TIRRELL 

Normy has bought out Burrell's store and is 
carrying on a very profitable business. 

ROBERT TITUS 

Bob is now owner and operator of the largest 
airport on the South Shore. He has seventeen 
planes of his own, all of different types. He 
gives flying lessons on the side, and it is rumored 
that he prefers young ladies as students. 

HELEN TOOMEY 

Helen is a meteorologist at the Logan Inter- 
national Airport. Her efficient work is doing a 
great deal toward making the airways safer. 

AUGUSTUS TRASK 

Gus now holds a part ownership in the Nash 
and Trask Rug Company. Since he has become a 
part owner, business has skyrocketed a hundred 
per cent. 

MARY TRASK 

Always the quiet type, Mary is now quietly 
but quickly making her way up the ladder in 
the medical field. 

PHYLLIS VACHON 

"Phyll" has settled down as a housewife in 
California and she loves it. 

MARION VAILLANCOURT 

Mai ion is a dental hygienist and her pleasing 
personality makes the office extremely pleasant. 

LESTER VENO 

Having graduated from Northeastern, "Les" 
is a civil engineer. He has established a business 
of his own, and is now the best civil engineer on 
the South Shore. 



JOHN VERGOBB1 

Alter graduating from Weymouth High School, 
Bob enlisted in the Navy in ordei to see the 
world. He is now Chief Pe:i\ Ollicei and doing 
line. He is living up to all the naval traditions 
particulary the one that sa\s, "A sailor has a 
girl in every poi t." 

JOSEPH WARD 

"Leo" has taken his father's place on the po- 
lice force. He soon expects to be Captain Ward. 

VIRGINIA WATSON 

"Ginny" is a great hat sty list. Her hats are 
being worn by all. 

PRISCILLA WEBB 

Pete has her own ultra-modem dress shop 
which features all the latest snlcs. 

DONALD WHITTEMORE 

Don is making the all-time high record in 
running. His speed is unequaled. 

RICHARD WHITTLE 

Vftei graduaing from lulls College, Dick 
has become a mechanical engineer. In his spare 
time he plays first trumpet with Kammy Saye 
and his band, appearing at a local "night spot" 
twice a week. 

BEVERLY WRIGHT 

"Bev" has achieved her ambition. She is now 
secretary to a well-known doctor. An interested 
onlooker observes that "Bev's" employer has a 
large numbei of new patients, among them a 
goodl) number of young men. 

VERNA WRIGHT 

Verna is personnel director for a New York 
firm. She claims that there are more opportun- 
ities in the "big city." 

EDWARD WYSOCKI 

Ed has become a gentleman farmer. In his 
spare time "Ed" is often seen dancing in the 
old town hall, where he is the feature attraction 
for all the country gals thereabouts. 

FRANK YAGER 

Frank is married and has a family. He is doing 
a good business in his new Ford garage. 



Page Thirty-four 



HIGH HONOR 
ESSAYS 



HIGH-HONOR ESSAY 



"American Foreign Policy" 

Nineteenth Century 




By LISBETH KOOPMAN 



1 i 



Page Thirty-six "Xii-? 



"No action whether foul or fair 
Is ever done, but it leaves somewhere 
A record written by fingers ghostly 
As a blessing or a curse, and mostly 
In the greater weakness or greater strength 
Of the acts which follow it." 

hen Henry Wadsworth Longfellow wrote these lines, he was applying "the 
record written by fingers ghostly" to the deeds of man himself. They may, however, 
be applied to the deeds of a nation. Any aetion of a unified country in civil or in 
foreign affairs, leaves a record in the acts, strong or weak, that follow it. American 
deeds in foreign policy have been left for all to see. f am looking at that record which 
begins in the 1700 s and ends at the turn of the nineteenth century. 

In the years immediately following the Revolutionary War, when we Ameri- 
cans had just acquired the right to call ourselves a country, our only foreign policy 
was a desire to secure the recognition of the Old World. This recognition came at a 
time when we were the least able to accept it. France, in the midst of a war with Eng- 
land, had sent a representative to us, demanding that we keep our promise of 1778 to 
aid her. Because we were in an unstable condition as a result of our own revolution, 
we made a shrewd statement in reply. We contended that we had entered the agree- 
ment with the former monarch of France, not with the present Jacobin regime. 
France, however, was not our only challenge. Great Britain, with her trading posts 
in Canada, and Spain with her control of New Orleans were inciting Indians to re- 
sist us at every turn. Since we were not strong or united enough to cope with these 
problems, Washington out of sheer necessity, in his farewell address urged a policy 
of isolation. 

In 1812, however, we made an exception to this idea of isolation, when we went 
to war with England. Neither country desired the conflict, but public opinion over 
here forced the decision. When the treaty was made two years later, it provided 
for the return to the conditions which prevailed before the war. The boundary of 
Canada was fixed, and the Missisippi question was open for negotiation. The real 
reason for our rejoicing, however, was that the causes of the war were removed. The 
Indians had been driven back, and Napoleon had fallen. 

At the conclusion of the wars in Europe, we were free of commitments in the 
Old World; we had purchased Louisiana and Florida, and were well on the way to 
expanding these new gains. We considered ourselves ready to go back to our isola- 
tionism, and to insure this, we published the Monroe Doctrine. 

The Monroe Doctrine is a statement which has become the cornerstone of our 
foreign policy. The Doctrine was prompted by the actions of Spain, who was trying 
to get back her New World Colonies, which had declared their independence. To 
prevent Spain's obtaining aid from Russia, Austria, Prussia, and France, President 
Monroe declared that this hemisphere was not open to colonization, and that such 
an act would be viewed as unfriendly toward the United States. This assertion has 
had a great influence in all our decisions, especially those concerning wars and 
treaties. 

Nevertheless, on several occasions, we have stepped out of the tight little circle 
which the Monroe Doctrine makes. For many years, we were interested in the rapid 
expansion of the West, and the necessary industries springing up as a result. It was 
in these times of great confidence and prosperity that we made our first digression 
from the Monroe Doctrine. We had been settling on any land that we chose, and 
when we wanted to annex Texas, Mexico became angry. War followed, and we de- 
cisively vanquished the Mexicans, in a conflict which might have been averted with 



<r5Sl> Page Thirty'seven 



a little diplomacy. Several years later, we did pay Mexico for damages. Bui whal 
( an be paid for lives? 

In the next few years, foreign policy lay forgotten, because internal trouble was 
fomenting. The question of slavery kept us more to ourselves than ever, and the n tin 
Civil War broke out. 

A second step from our voluntary isolation was the purchase ol Alaska. This 
brought us our first possession which was not attached to our country, and which 
pushed our influence to the northern Pac.fic. Although this purchase helped to de- 
velop the importance of the West, there was another reason behind the acquistion. 
The Russians had been settling there, and as we wanted isolation at any cost, we 
bought Alaska to prevent foreign influence. 

Our first major break out of isolation came with our interest in the Latin Amer- 
ican countries. This interest has continued to the present time, but it is now called, 
"The Good Neighbor Policy." fames G. Blaine, our fiery Secretary of State, fought 
to establish a Pan-American Union with all the South American countries. When 
the Union was formed, Blaine secured a tariff reduction for those Latin American 
countries which would reduce their tariff rates. These countries were suspicious ol 
our moves, as well they might be, for we had conquered our own country and were 
looking for new fields. When our drive to the Pacific had been completed, we had 
begun to realize that our foreign policy was outgrown. Capital, which had financed 
the Westward expansion, began to look for new markets. We were steadily acquir- 
ing more islands in the Pacific ostensibly to be used as coaling stations by our en- 
larged merchant fleet, which was now tr ading with the Far East on a large sc ale. Our 
naval fleet too, was increasing. We began to realize the power we had in our resour- 
ces and trade, and to believe that we were a great nation, capable of exerting our in- 
fluence throughout the world. 

With this concept newly formed, it was natural that we became involved in t he- 
Cuban situation. Our concern lay in the fact that we owned millions of dollars' 
worth of interest in the sugar, tobacco, and mines of the country. With the Monroe 
Doctrine in mind, we felt ourselves obliged to help our neighbor Cuba. The insur- 
rection of the freedom-loving Cubans against their cruel Spanish rulers, was steadily 
growing more complicated. Neither Spain nor we wished to go to war, for our com- 
mercial interests were at stake, while Spain might have trouble at home. The Amer- 
ican newspapers inflamed the people here with reports of the De Lome letter, which 
maligned President McKinley, and then, the Ma ne was sunk! Without considering 
what caused the explosion aboard the battleship, the public screamed "Remember 
the Ma ne!" The President set the question of war to Congress, but did not deem it 
necessary to add that Spain was ready to give Cuba her freedom. Congress declared 
war. Our enlarged fleet came into use when we captured the Pacific possessions ol 
Spain. After this short but dec sive, war, we found ourselves with several new 
possessions; Guam, Puerto Rico, and the Philippines. We were coming out of our 
isolation. 

In orre hundred years, Amer'ca had gained recognition, and with this recogni- 
tion, the power to turn her back on foreign entanglements, declaring that she 
wished to be left alone. The experiences of the twentieth century would prove the 
value, wisdom, and strength of this policy in keeping America a world power. 

"/ do not know beneath what .sky 
Nor on what seas shall be thy fait. 
I only know it .shall be high, 
I only know it .shall be great." 



Page Thirty-eight 'Xfi^ 



HIGH-HONOR ESSAY 



^American Foreign Policy" 

Twentieth Century 




r^V» Page Thirtymine 



■Let us now continue the progressive history of our foreign policy beginning with 
the twentieth century. Since 1900, this policy has been divided into three distinct 
parts: our action in behalf of our United Stales and the other countries oi this hem- 
isphere; our interest in the Far East; and our concern in European affairs. In the 
Americas, we undertook to follow the tenets set forth in the most influential docu- 
ment, the Monroe Doctrine. As a self-appointed protector oi our less significant 
neighbors, the United States exerted uncalled powers ovei parts oi Latin Amei ii a. 
In order to defend those countries and insure our own interests, we forbade nations, 
such as Germany, England, and Spain, to set foot on that land in accordance with 
our interpretation of the before-mentioned doc n ine. Also, as a major power in 
world affairs, our country sent delegates to the Hague Conferences and supported 
the Hague Court before which all nations might present their disputes lor arbitra- 
tion. 

Since the Spanish American War, our attention has been definitely drawn to t lie 
problems of the Far East. Having gained control ol the Philippines as a result of 
this war, our country noticed that other nations of the world were busy grasping 
for influence in China. Their struggles had not concerned us or worried us until we 
were in a position to request trade with China on an equal looting with the test ol 
the world. We initiated in China "The Open Door Policy", which guaranteed out 
equality and prevented China's being split by her more powerful neighbors. This 
move on our part strengthened our friendship with her. 

Then as Japan began to enlarge, the United States, seeing an opportunity lor 
furthur trade, befriended her also. Although Japan was growing more powerful 
and was expanding, we did not use caution in regard to her. because she 
seemed so small and dependent. We continued to supply her with all ty pes of ma- 
terials which she allowed to accumulate over a period of about two decades. 

Early in the twentieth century, the countries of Latin America began to grow 
more independent. They resented the arrogant attitude of the United States, and 
we, realizing their desire to be completely self-reliant, changed the character of our 
policy, fnstead of being their dominant protector, we entered into an agreement in 
which all the countries of this hemisphere vowed to help each other in time of need. 
Our attitude was that of a friendly equal rather than a haughty superior. This be- 
came known as "Our Good Neighbor Policy." 

For many years, the United States has taken an indifferent point of view in 
European affairs. Notwithstanding her active participation in the Hague Confer- 
ences, she has done everything possible to keep out of foreign entanglements. In 
1914, our country was forced into a war, supposedly to end all wars, World War I. 
Many of our young men were killed beside equally courageous soldiers of different 
nationalities. Nevertheless, despite this strong bond brought about by our common 
struggle and subsequent loss, our nation maintained its policy of isolation. In 1918, 
Woodrow Wilson tried to guide us to the place we had among the nations of the 
world, but we were not yet ready to declare our hand. The League of Nations was 
formed without the suport of one of the greatest nations in the world, the United 
States, although we agreed with most of its aims and principles. 

However, in order to preserve the peace we had struggled for and prevent an- 
other war, our country accepted the agreements of the Washington Conference in 



Page Forty c \S r ' 



1921 and the London Conference in 1930, boih prov iding lor Limitations of the na- 
val power and armament of the principal nations of the world. In 1922, the United 
States sponsored and signed the Four Power Pad along with Great Britain, France, 
and Japan; then, later, the Nine Power Pact with involved several smaller nations 
as well. We were also included in the Pac t of Paris in 1928, supported by fifty-six na- 
tions and stating that all disputes were to be settled by arbitration only, not by vio- 
lence or war. Some reciprocal trade agreements that we entered should have made 
clear our responsibilities as a leading nation of the world. 

When Franklin Delano Roosevelt came to power, he found us still wary of en- 
tangling ourselves. During prosperous years our people saw no need to interfere 
with other nations and borrow trouble; during depression, the whole interest re- 
volved around maintaining a livelihood. The United States did not build up her 
armed forces as a measure to protect the agreements she had entered; Japan did not 
comply with the treaties she had made; other nations broke their promises and di- 
saster was again hovering over us. Gradually, our nation became aware of the ne- 
cessity of preparing lor this second great struggle. With the attack on Pearl Harbor, 
America finally went all out lor war. We became a nation of action then — a nation 
to demand respect. We realized that new inventions had decreased the size of our 
protective ocean. Roosevelt had just before formulated the Atlantic Charter with 
Churchill. Several other important negotiations were carried on between our pres- 
ident and the leaders of Britain, Russia, and China. Conferences at Moscow, Cairo, 
Teheran, and San Francisco helped to compose our new policies. 

At these conferences, the countries of the world laid the foundations for one of 
the greatest organizations of all times, the United Nations. Now that the war has 
ended, we have begun to concentrate on making a success of this great union which 
guarantees peace and security to all countries. There are six principal parts to the 
organization: the General Assembly, that functions mostly as an adviser; the Securi- 
ty Council, that has the final say in all matters; the International Court of Justice to 
settle all judicial questions; the Secretarist, a permanent steering committee; the 
Econom cs and Social Council, which makes recommendations to the General 
Assembly that fall under its category; and the Trusteeship Council, consisting of na- 
tions with trust territories. 

Every far sighted American realizes that there will be many trials, many dis- 
agreements, but each hopes that the United Nat.ons will be unified enough to over- 
come these obstacles. As we have the experiences and the mistakes of the League to 
profit by, results should prove more extensive than before. An organization, such as 
this, if loyally supported by every nation, will become a fair judge of international 
affairs and will guarantee everlasting peace, thus carrying out the principles advoca- 
ted by our first President, George Washington, when he said, "Observe good faith 
and justice towards all nations; cultivate peace, and harmony with all". 



£-^V» Page Forty'onc 



THE PERFECT SENIOR 



Girl 


Boy 


Hair — Jean Kcohan 


Hair— John Ries 


Eyes — Doris Wright 


Eyes — Robert Stitt 


Smile — Margaret Kelly 


Smile — Ralph Amabile 


Intellect — Martha Nickerson 


Intellect — Kurt Konrad 


Cleverness — Lisbcth Koopman 


Stature — Edmund Caracciolo 


Dignity — Barbara Loud 


Dignity — Francis Newcomb 


Sense of Humor — Jean Stevens 


Humor — James Casey 


Disposition — Margaret Kelly 


Disposition — Ralph Amabile 


Voice — Eleanor McCafferty 


Voice — John Pappas 


Sportsmanship — Jean Keohan 


Sportsmanship — Bruce Hunt 


Friendliness — Sara Mapes 


Clothes — Neil Doherty 


Clothes — Shirley Osborn 


Pep — George Curtin 


Pep — Helen Keblis 


Dependability — Ralph Amabile 


Trustworthiness — Mary Mcrten 


Naivete — Frank Aiello 


Complexion — Marilyn Mcintosh 


Complexion — Robert Carter 


Figure — Helen Keblis 


Brutality — Richard Gould 



Page Forty'two 



SENIOR 
WHO'S WH( 





MARJORIE ABBO I I 

Weymouth Landing College Course "Margie" 
Senior Play 4; dee C'luli 1. 2; Musical Revue 2; 
Class History 4; Home Room Messenger 1, 3, 4; 
Fire Drill Duty 3, 4; Honor:, 1. 3, 4. 

Gay (food nature sparkles in her eyes. 

FR \\k AIELLO 

East Weymouth Business Course 
Class Treasurer 3, 4; Reflector Slaff 4; Baseball 3, 
4; Track 2; Usher at (Graduation 3; Student Coun- 
cil 3, 4; Home Room Spelling liee Champion 3; 
Junior Party 3; Ticket collector at Senior Play 4; 
Honors t, 2, 3, 4. 

/i #00</ />a/ i'j fon# remembered. 

DONALD ALLEN 

Hraintree — Auto Repair Course Pun 
Graduation Dance 4. 

.Sir. / would rather be right than be President. 

RALPH AMABILE 

Weymouth Landing Business Course 
Class President 3. 4; Projection Club 4; Nom- 
' Dating Committee 3; Junior Party 3; Junior Dec- 



1 irati n 
Us 



Jl J UIIIUI X III IJ J , j U11IWI l', 

3; Christmas Party 4; Baseball t, 2, 3. 4; 



ci at Graduation 3. 

By different methods different men creel. 
But here is one who can do all things well. 

EVELYN ANDERSON 

North VVeymouth — Business Course "Evie" 
Reflector Staff 4; Candy Girl at Football (James 4; 
Christmas Party 4; Class Banquet 4; Softball 3; 
Assistant Cheer Leader 3. 4; Usher at Concert 4; 
Lunch Room Duty 2; (Jregs Transcription Cer- 
tificate for 60 words per minute 3. 

An active, wise, and witty lass. 

VIRGINIA" ANDERSON 

North Weymouth— -Business Course "Ginny" 
Class Motto 4 ; Track 3 ; Candy ( Jirl at Football 
Games 4. 

Never worry; it doesn't pay. 
HELEN ANDERSSON 

North Weymouth — Business Course "Kid "Andy'' 
Reflector Staff 3; Weymouth Highlights 3: Nom- 
inating Committee 3; Student Council 4; I'sher at 
Concert 4; Class Prophecy 4; Junior High Office 3; 
Work at Print Shop 4. 

The eyes are the mirrors of the soul. 

DOROTHEA ANDRIAN 

South Weymouth— -College Course "Dot" "Andy" 
Class Will 4; Play Reading Committee 4; Weymouth 
Highlights 3; Honors 2. 3, 4. 
He that loves reading has everything within his 
reach. 



MARY BACCHIER] 

North Weymouth — -Business Course 
Christmas Party 4 ; Gregg Transcription Certifi- 
cate for 60 words per minute 3. 

A good sport, a good friend. 



MARY BATCHELDER 

North Weymouth — Business Course 
Junior Party 3 ; Class Banquet 4. 

Liked by all who know her 



Betty 



DOROTHY BEAZLEY 

South Weymouth-- Business Course Dott it- 

Reflector Staff 3. 4; Student Council Assistant 4; 
Graduation Clothing 4 ; Junior II igh ( )ffice 3 ; At- 
tendance Slips 4 ; Secretary to Mr. Steele 4 ; 
Honors 4. 

A merry heart makcth a cheerful countenance. 

NORMA BEDFORD 

North Weymouth Business Course Nom 
Glee Club i, _> ; Lunch Room Duty 1, 2; Nominat- 
ing Committee 4. 

Laugh and the world laughs with you. 



Page Forty'four r V&- ? 



HERMAN BENEDICT 

Weymouth Landing- General Course llerm 
None but himself eon he his parallel. 

LOUISE BIANCO 

Fast Weymouth Business Course 
Band i; Class Outing 4; Track 2. 

Personality is the first rung up the ladder of 
success. 



ROM. BIANCO 

East Weymouth— Business Course Rosie 
Junior Decorating 3; Attendance Slips 4; Sec- 
retary to Mr. Steele 4. 

Far way ivc look for one so cheerful. 

HOPE BILLARD 

Weymouth Landing — General Course Hopic 
Reflector Staff 3; Weymouth Highlights 3; Class 
Banquet 4. 

Laugh your way through life. 



ROBERT BOUCHIE 

North Weyouth — Sheet Metal Course Bush 
Class Prophecy 4; Christmas Party 4. 

Napoleon was also a great man. 

[AMES BOUDREAU 

North Weymouth — General Course 

Class Motto 4; Ticket Collector at Concert and 

Senior Play 4. 

The friendly heart always wins many friends. 



HENRY BOUTILIKR 

Weymouth Heights— College Course Hank 
French Cluli 3; Graduation Clothing 4; Ticket Col- 
lector at Concert 4; Home Room Messenger 2; Fire 
Drill Duty 4. 

He eon 011 all things well dispute, 
Refute, change hands, and still refute. 

JOHN BRADY 

East Weymouth — College Course Jack 
Class Will 4; Baseball 2. 3, 4; Basketball 2; Honors 
1, 2, 4. 

His thoughts arc his own. 



JAMES BRAYSHAW 

Weymouth Landing— College Course Jim 
Projection Club 4; Model Manglers 1; Who's Who 
4; Ticket Collector at Concert and Senior Play 4; 
Honors 1, 2. 3, 4. 

By honor and labor always aiming higher. 

)OHN BROCKLESBY 

East W r eymouth — General Course Brock 
Projection Club 4; Ticket Collector at Concert and 
Senior Play 4; Class Outing 4. 

A lad with possibilities. 

PAUL BUCHAN 

North Weymouth— (ieneral Course 
Ticket Collector at Concert and Senior Play 4; 
Student Council Assistant 4; Senior Prom 4; Junior 
Decorating 3; Honors 4. 

Rejoice, O young man, in thy youth. 

ANN BUCKMAN 

Weymouth Heights — College Course Bucky 
Class Will 4; Honors 4. 

Gracious in her manners, 

Winning in her ways. 



ft 




P. 












d 

> 

■ 


■ — ■ — ~~ 

k i 








1 V L i 1*1 



r^SVi Page Forty-five 






MARY BUDD 

East Weymouth Business Course Buddie 
Orchestra i, 2; Glee Chili 1; Hume Room Messenger 
2; Usher at Senior Play 4. 

A sunny disposition is the very soul of success. 

\A I M il. BUI LER 

Weymouth Landing College Course Natle, Sue 
Reflector Staff 4; Weymouth Highlights 2: Class 
History 4; Musical Kevue 2; Christmas Assembly 
1; I'sher at Senior Play 4; Honors 1, 4. 

Personality plus. 



ALBER1 CAIN 

Weymouth Landing College Course /!/ 
He who knows his mind does not fear the future. 

EDMUND CARACCIOLO 

East Weymouth- College Course Ed, Carach 

Student Council 2, 3, 4, President 4; Nominating 
Committee a; Class Outing 4; Football 1. 2, 3, 4; 
Basketball r. 2, 3, 4; Honors 4. 

His duties 'well performed , his days well spent. 



ELAINE CARIS I I 

South Weymouth liusiness Course Lainy 
His witty replies come ever quickly. 

JEAN CARR 

Weymouth Landing General Course Jean 
Weymouth Highlights 3; Graduation Dance 4. 
A smiling face is no detriment . 



ROBERT CAR I ER 

.North Wymouth- College Course Shorty, Gremlin 
Student Council 3; Projection Club 4; Track 3; 
Football Manager 4; Book Room Duty 3; Lunch 
Room Duty 2, 3, 4; Fire Drill 3, 4; Class History 
Chairman 4. 

His witty replies come ever quickly. 

I A MIS CASEY 

South Weymouth- College Course Jim 
Senior Play 4; Glee Club 2; Class Prophecy 4; 
Junior Decorating 3; French Club 3; American 
Legion Oratorical Contest Alternate 4; Honors i, 
2, i- 4- 

Never a loss for a quick remark. 



LAWRENCE CASSESE 

East Weymouth — Agricultural Course Larry 
Good fellowship is beyond price. 

CAROL CHAMBERS 

North Weymouth— —General Course Col 
Glee Club i, 2; Musical Revue 2; Reflector Staff 
3 ; Weymoutn H ighlights 3 ; Nominating Committee 
3; Lunch Room Duty I. 

Her very frotvns arc fairer far. 

Than smiles of other maidens are. 



JEAN CHASE 

East Wevmouth — Business Course 
Reflector Staff 4; Glee Club 1; Who's Who 4; 
Track 3; Softball 3; Gregg Transcription Certifi- 
cate for 60 words per minute 3. 

True ;o her word, her work, and her friends. 



FLORINE CHISHOLM 

South Weymouth — Home 



Economics 



B Course 
Chick 

Class Outing 4. 

A mind serene for contemplation. 



Page Forty-six 'Xi^' 



VNN ( I M I. IN 

East Weymouth Business Course Nan, Nancy 

Class Motto 4; Softball t, .i; Gregg Transcription 
Certificate for 60 words per minute 3; 100 words 



It's nice to be natural when v< 



mil a 1 nil v nict 



FREDERICK CLAIN 

East Weymouth Cabinet making Course Freddie 
Senior Prom 4; Junior Decorating 2; Track 2; 
Wrestling 2, 4; Scenery for Senior Play 1, 2\ 
M usical Revue 1 . 

Why don't I leave the girls alone? 



I I 1/ A HI-. I II CLARK 

North Weymouth— General Course Betty, Betsy 
Glee Club 2; Musical Revue 2; Junior Party .5; 
Nominating Committee 4; Graduation Dance 4; 
Softball 1, 2; Home Room Messenger 2. 

She danees lightly on the wings of song. 

ALEXANDER CLAWSON 

East Weymouth — (leneral Course Alec 
Class Outing 4. 

Care will kill a eat, and therefore let's be merry. 



SHIRLEY COLE 

North Weymouth — Business Course 
Senior Prom 4; Usher at Concert 4; 
Duty 1 ; Honors 4. 

Quietness is best. 



Lunch Room 



GEORGE COLEMAN 

South Weymouth- College Course 
Class Will 4; Usher at Graduation 3. 

Wisdom is better than rubies. 



JOSEPH CONCANNON 

East Kraintree — Auto Repair Course Joe 
Who's Who 4. 

A nice UN-particular man. 

ANN CONNOLLY 

North Weymouth Business Course 
(Ilee Club I, 2; Christmas Party 4. 

Always ready with a smile. 

And one that makes our life worth while. 



WALTER COOK 

South Weymouth- College Course fVally 
Who's Who 4; Home Room Spelling liee Cham- 
pion 3; Honors 4. 

Silence is a quality of good character. 

PHILIP COPE 

Weymouth Landing — General Course Phil 
Class Motto 4. 

Nothing is achieved before it be thoroughly at- 
tempted. 



MARTHA COREY 

Weymouth — Business Course 

Reflector Staff 4; Senior Prom 4; Crtgg Tran- 
scription Certificate for 60 words per minute 3. 
Step after step the ladder is ascended. 

CAROLYN CORRIDA N 

Weymouth Landing — General Course Carol 
Senior Play 4; Choir 4, (dee Club 1; Class History 
»; Book Room Duty 4; Student Council Assistant 
. 3. 4; Cregg Transcription Certificate for 60 and 
o words per minute 3. too words 4. Honors 1. 
We all envy her beautiful voice. 



v if 




Jf ^m-y ^ 




U 




N(*ft;. : M 


• 


V 









c^Vj Page Forty'seven 




MARY CORRIDAN 

South Weymouth College Course 
French Club 3 ; Weymouth Highlights 3; Class Will 
4; Softball 3; Home Room Messenger 3, 4 ; Honors 
1 . 

Her quiet dignity and simple way, 
Win her admiration every day. 

WILLIAM COVENEY 

South Weymouth — Sheet Metal Course Bill 
Football t; Baseball 1, 2; Basketball 1, 2; Exhibition 
1,2,3; U- S. Army. 

A finished gentleman from top to toe. 



JOHN COYLE 

East Weymouth— Business Course 
Class History 4, Baseball 3; Home Room Mes- 
senger 2; Home Room Spelling Bee Champion 2; 
Assistant at Legion Field Broadcasting Booth during 
Football Season 2, 3, 4 ; Honors 1 , 2. 3. 4. 
The good and the wise lead quiet lives. 

VIRIGINIA CRAWFORD 

Weymouth Landing Business Course Gvtmie 
Glee Club 1; Class Will 4; Student Council Assist- 
ant 4; Fire Drill Duty 4; Attendance Slips 4. 
Anywhere, anywhere, out of this world. 



RICHARD CRONIN 

East Weynmuth - College Course 
Class History 4; Track 1, 2. 

The stronger always succeed. 



Dick 



[EAN CROSS 

Weymouth Landing — Busine 
Graduation Dance 4; Studenl 
Patience is c 



s Course Jean 
Council 2. Assistant \. 
virtue. 



[AMES CURLEY 

South Hingham — Agricultural Course 
Class Motto 4. 

What man dare, I dure. 



Jim 



GEORGE CI R I IN 

East Weymouth — College Course Sonny 
Aviation Club i; Track i, 2, 3; Hook Room Duty 
2, 3, 4; Class Prophecy 4; Junior Rotary 4. 
There's mischief in his smile. 



DOUGLAS DADEAU 

East Weymouth — General Course Doug 
Class Outing 4: Honors 2. 

Dadcau. put that newspaper away I 

GILBERT DALEY 

Weymouth Heights — General Course Gil 
Class Banquet 4- 

Sometimcs quiet is an unquiet tinny. 



JAMES DELOREY 

East Weymouth — General Course Jimtnic 
Student Council Assistant 4; Graduation Clothing 4. 
A little humor is relished by the best of men. 

ELIZABETH DEWEY 

Weymouth Landing College Course Topsy 
Reflector Staff 1; Senior Play 4; Glee Clu!> 1. 2; 
Junior Party 3; Class Prophecy 4; Honors 1. 

Not only complexion of peaches and cream. 

Hut hair that shines and eyes that gleam. 



Page Forty-eight "XSi-? 



ALAN DEWEY 

Norih Weymouth Business Course At 
Christmas Party 4; Baseball 1. j, 3, 1; Football 3, 4; 
Cross Country i, 2; Track [, 2 ; Lunch Room Duty 
3 ; Student Council 1, 2. 

To dare, and again dare, and forever dare. 

fOSEPH DILLON 

Weymouth Heights (ieneral Course Joe 
Class Outing 4. 

Where there's a will, there's a way. 



PHYLLIS DOANE 

Weymouth Landing— College Course I'hxl 
Class History 4; Nominating Committee 3; I 'slur at 
Senior Play 4. 
The good things in life are sometimes the smallest. 

PAUL DOBLE 

South Weymouth Cabinetmaking Course Chubby 
Choir 2. 4; Scenery for Senior Play 1. 
There must be some hard work in him, but none of 
it ever came out. 



NEIL DOHERTY 

North Weymouth — (ieneral Course Freckles, Nails 
Graduation Dance 4; Cross Country [, 2; Track 
1, 2, 4; Football Manager 3, 4; Nominating Com- 
mittee 3; Usher at Graduation 3; Honors 4. 

To know him is a pleasure. 

THOMAS DONOVAN 

East Weymouth — College Course Tom 
Glee Club 1, Wrestling 4; Track 3; Senior Prom 4. 
Wit is the salt of conversation. 



DONALD DuVAL 

Weymouth Landing — General Course Don 
Class Banquet 4. 

His calm is undisturbed. 

JOHN EGAN 

Easi Weymouth — General Course Jack 
Trouble runs off him, like water off a duck's back. 



MELVIN ELLIS 

South Hanson — Printing Course Mel 
Class Will 4. 

Silence is golden or is it. 

HERBERT EMILSON 

North Weymouth — College Course Herb 
Honors 1. 

Calm is he -who knows his way. 



FRANK EVERT ON 

South Weymouth — (ieneral Course 

Weymouth Highlights 3; Play Reading Committee 
4; Honors 3, 4. 

Never without a camera. 

PEARL FARGO 

South Weymouth — Business Course 
Glee Club 1. 2; Reflector Staff 4; Home Room 
Messenger 3; Attendance Slips 4; Home Room 
Class Dues Collector 3, 4. 

A most efficient secretary. 




c^Vj Page Forty-nine 




ANN FEKKES 

South Weymouth College Course 
Class Prophecy 4; Usher at Senior Play 4; Honor- 4. 
The best of life is conversation. 

FELICE FERGUSON 

South Weymouth — General Course Flicky 
Weymouth High School 1, 4; Glee Club 1. Lincoln 
High School, Manitowoc, Wisconsin 2; Washington 
Lee High School, Arlington, Virginia; Lower Merion 
High School, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 3 : Riding 
Club 3; Latin-American Club 3, 

A quiet girl whose nature never varies. 



PRESLEY I' OS I ER 

South Weymouth— Cabinetmaking Course Press 
Choir 2, 3; Senior Prom 4; Scenery for Senior Play 
2, Musical Revue 1. 

Not too serious, not too gay — a good fellow. 

ROGER FREEMAN 

East Weymouth — Business Course Rog, Spook 

Graduation Dance Chairman 4; Nominating Com- 
mittee 4; Track 1, 2, 3. 4; Cross Country 2, 3. 4, 
Captain 3, 4. 

Why does he blush so? 



CONSTANCE FRYER 

Weymouth — Business Course Connie 
Reflector Staff 4; Choir 3. 4; Glee Club 1,2; Gradu- 
ation Clothing 4. 

Friends have all things in common. 

ELEANOR FURBISH 

Weymouth — Business Course Mac 
Gregg Transcription Certificate or 60 words per 
minute 3. 

Thought alone is eternal. 



RICHARD GARDNER 

South Weymouth — College Course Dick 
Class Prophecy 4; Book Room Duty 2, 3, 4; Pro- 
jection Club 4. 

Never trouble trouble until trouble troubles you. 

RITA GAROFALO 

East Weymouth — Business Course 
Weymouth Highlights 3; Senior Prom 4; Lunch 
Room Duty 1.2; Gregg Transcription Certificate for 
60 words per minute 3. 

The blush is beautiful, but it is sometimes incon- 
venient. 

AUDRY GARSIDE 

East Weymouth — Business Course .lud 
Glee Club 1. 2; Weymouth Highlights 3; Student 
Council Assistant 3. 4; Who's Who 4; Track 3; 
Lunch Room Duty 1. 2; Musical Revue 2; Fire 
Drill Duty 4; Gregg Transcription Certificate for 60 
words per minute 3; Home Room Spelling Bee 
Champion 1; Attendance Slips 4; Honors 1. 

Joy rises in her, like a summer's morn. 

LOIS GILL 

North Weymouth — College Course Lo 
Class Prophecy 4; Softball 3; Spelling Bee Cham- 
pion 1; Usher at Concert 4; Active Junior Red 
Cross 2, 3. . 

Her personality and appearance arc equally 
attractive. 



ROBERT GILLIGAN 

East Weymouth — Business Course Bob, Gill 

Senior Prom 4; Musical Revue 2. 

Quiet at first, but wait until you know him. 

RICHARD GOULD 

East Weymouth — General Course Caspar, Dick 
Football i, 2, 3. 4; Track 4; Fire Drill Duty 2, 3, 4; 
Lunch Room Duty 1, 2, 3, 4. 

/ see no reason for a five-day school week. 



Page Fifty *\^> 



MIRIAM GOURLEY 

South Weymouth Business Course Chick 
Glee Club i ; Reflector Staff 3, 4; Class Will 4; Girls' 
Baseball 3; Home Room Spelling Champion 2; Sec 
retary to M r. Lyond 4 ; Gregg Transcription Cer- 
tificate for 60 words and 80 worrls per mi unit .i , 
[00 and 1 jo words per minute 4; Honors £j High 
Honors 4. 

It isn't my fault that sometimes the bus leaves before 
I get there. 

PHILIP GRASSO 

East Weymouth General Course Zekc, O' Grass 
Nominating Committee 3 ; Senior Prom 4 ; Football 
,i ; 1 nt ram oral Basketball 1 ; Lunch Room Dutj 2, 
4; Fire Drill Duty 3. 4. 

We're all pals together. 

ALLEN HAAS 

South Weymouth — College Course 
Home Room Spelling Bee Champion 2. 

Still waters run deep. 

GERALD HACKETT 

North Weymouth — General Course Squeak, Spook 
Graduation Dance 4; Wrestling 4. 

Shall I begin with the usual jokes? 



MARY HAILSTONE 

North Weymouth — Business Course Buntx 
Graduation Clothing 4; Softball 1, 3. 

Full of szveetness, yum, and giggles. 

JACK HALL 

East Weymouth — Cabinetmaking Course Clancy 
Hand 2, 4; Choir 4; Class Prophecy ; Track 2; 
Scenery for Musical Revue 1 and Senior Play 1, 2. 
A poor excuse is better than none. 



BRUCE HALLGREN 

North Weymouth — Printing Course Press 
Secretary-Treasurer 4; Basketball 2; Exhibition 4. 
Head and shoulders above the crozvd, 

HEBERT HANSEN 

North Weymouth — General Course Herb 
Ticket Collector at Senior Play 4. 

Throw your troubles to the wind. 



WALTER HANSEN 

North Abington — Auto Repair Course Wallie 
Class History 4. 

How's the weather up there? 

JACQUELINE HANSON 

North Weymouth — Business Course Jackie 
Glee Club 1; Senior Prom 4; Attendance Slips 4; 
Gregg Transcription Certificates for 60 words per 
minute 3; for 80 words 4. 

Have you ever seen a dream walking. 



PATRICIA HARKIN 

Weymouth — General Course I'at, Tricia 

Glee Club 2 ; Musical Revue 2 ; Usher at Winter 
Concert 4; Weymouth Highlights 3; Gregg Trans- 
cription Certificates for 60 words per minute 3; for 
80 words 4. 

Unfortunately my social activities often 
interfere with my homework. 

ENID HAVES 

South Weymouth — College Course 
Home Room Messenger 1 ; Honors 1. 

Quiet, yet alert and full of fun. 




c^Si* Page Fifty-one 



























^ 1 





[OHN HEALEY 

North Weymouth General Course Johnny, Jack 

Braintree High i, 2. 3; Photographer Committee 3; 
Weymouth High 4; Class Outing 4; Honor-. 1. 
Every woman may he won 

[RENE HEAVER 

East Weymouth — Business Course 
Nominating Committee 3 ; Graduation Dance ; 
Assistant Student Council 4 ; Gregg Transcription 
Certificate for 60 words per minute 3. 

// is tranquil people who accomplish mueh. 



WILLIAM HENRY 

North Weymouth — Auto Repair Course 
Football 1 ; Class Prophecy 4. 

My right there is none to dispute. 

KVKIA N HKRRICK 

North Weymouth — Business Course Evic 
Did someone mention work ? 



HELEN HILLIAR1) 

North Weymouth — Business Course 
(ilee Club 1; Nominating Committee 4; Home Room 
Messenger 1. 2; Secretary to Miss Nye 4; Home 
Spelling Hee Champion 3; (iregg Trarscription Cer- 
tificates for 60 worrls and 80 words per minute 3; 
for 100 words 4; Honors 1, 2, 3. 4. 

Always cheerful, always hind. 
Such a girl we like to find. 

HAZEL HOLBROOK 

South Weymouth — Business Course Twinnie 
Outing Committee 4; L T sher at Senior Play 4; 
Gregg Transcription Certificate for 60 ivords per 
minute 3. 

That wasn't my fault; it must have been 
my other half. 

HILDA HOLBROOK 

South Weymouth — Business Course 
Outing Committee 4; Usher at Senior Play 4; 
Softball 1, 3; Lunch Room Duty 1, 2; Gregg 
Transcription Certificate for 60 words per minute 3. 
At times it is convenient to Have a twin. 

RAYMOND HOLBROOK 

Weymouth — College Course Ray 
Orchestra 2. 3. 4; Foothall 1. 

His thoughts arc his own. 



ESTHER HOSMER 

South Weymouth — General Course Tillie 
Speak to me of horses, and I am your friend. 

CARLTON HULTEEN 

South Weymouth — General Course Carl 
Projection Club 4; Christmas Assembly 4. 

A good naturcd man is he. 



ELINOR HUMPHREY 

Weymouth —College Course HI 
Glee Club 1; Class History 4; Christmas Part- 4: 
Home Room Messenger 4; Home Room Spelling 
Ree Champion t; Honors t, 3. 4. 

She is the ideal hostess. 

BRUCE HUNT 

North Weymouth— College Course Rabbit 
Nominating Committee 3; Class Outing, Chairman 4; 
Football 1, 2, 3. 1, Canlain t. Track r, 2. 3, 4; 
Intramural Basketball 1; Fire Drill Duty 2. 3. 4; 
Kunch Room Duty 1, 2, 3. 4. 

Once you know him, lie's not easy to forget. 



Page Fifty'two r \&-' 



BARBARA HUSBAND 

South Weymouth Business Course Barb 
Glee Club i , 2; Who's Who, Chairman 4 ; Play 
Reading Committee 4; Hemic Room Messenger 3; 
Secretary to Mr. Nelson 4; Gregg Transcription 
Certificates for 80 words per minute 3; for 100 
and 1 20 woi ds 4 ; Complimentary Member of the 
Old Colony Club 4; Honors 1, 2, 3, High Honors \. 
She may seem quiet and also shy, 
Hut if you knew her — oh, my! 

RALPH JACKSON 

East Weymouth Business Course 
Class Banquet -t; Football i, 2, ,j, 4; Intramural 
Basketball i; Lunch Room Duty 3; Assistant 
Student Council 4. 

Life is so complicated. 

WILLIAM JACOBS 

Weymouth Landing— Sheet Metal Course Jake, Bill 
Nominating Committee 4. 

What will they do without me? 

ARTHUR JONES 

North Weymouth — College Course Jonesie 
Nominating Committee 4; Class Will 4; Football 
1, 2; Cross Country 3; Honors 1, 2, 4. 

Openly quiet, but often fools us, 

ALVIN KAISER 

Plymouth- Auto Repair Course Al 
Class Outing 4. 

You ng fellows will be young fellows. 

VIRIGINA KALAJIAN 

North Weymouth — College Course Gin/ny 
Senior Play 4; Class Motto 4; Softball 3; Honors 
4- 

When she will, she will; when she won't, 
she simply will not. 

ROBERT KARNAN 

South Weymouth — General Course Fingers 
1'tica Free Academy, Utica, N. Y. I, 2; Choir 1. 
2; Radio Club 2; Punchinello Drama Club 2; War 
Stamp Salesman 2; Weymouth High School 3, 4; 
Senior Play 4; Choir 3; Class Prophecy 4; High 
Honors 1, 2, 4. 

The blacks and whites jump at his touch. 

ROBERT KARSTUNEN 

East Weymouth — Sheet Metal Course Bob 
Who's Who 4; Baseball 2, 4. 

No legacy is so rich as honesty. 

HELEN KKBLIS 

East Weymouth — College Course Kcby 
Reflector Staff 4; Boosters' Club 4; Senioi Play 4; 
Class Banquet 4; Track 3; Softball 3; Cheerleaders 
■ 4. Home Room Messenger 1; Cafeteria Cashier 

1, 2; Assistant Student Council 3, 4; Honors :, 

2, 2. 4- 

Who can knew her and resist her charm? 

MARGARET KELLY 

North Weymouth - College Course Margie, Mary 
Student Council 1. 2, 3; Secretary 4; Boosters' 
Club 4; Christmas Party 4; Class Banquet 4; 
Home Room Messenger 2; Music. il Revue 2; 
Cheerleader 2, 3, 4; Co captain 4; Cnristmas As- 
sembly Properties 4; 

There's magic in that Irish smile. 

SHIRLEY KEMP 

North Weymouth — College Course Shirl 
French Club 3; Class Motto 4; Junior Parly 3; 
Junior Decorating 3. 

Always smiling and always on the go. 

[LAN KEOHAN 

Weymouth — College Course 

Class Will 4; Junior Decorating 3; Musical Re- 
vue Scenery 2; Softball 3; Track 3; Cheerleader 4; 
Home Room Spelling Bee Champion 2. 

She's the sweetheart of 216. 

And also of a certain marine. 




4 ', 



C^Sij Page Fifty'thrce 



LOIS KERR 

Fast Weymouth — Business Course Lo, Loie 

Honors i. 

Wherefore comes that (fleam in her eye? 
BARBARA KILBURN 

North Weymouth — Business Course Killie 
Reflector Staff 2, 3, 4; Junior Decorating 3; Senior 
Prom 4; Active Junior Red Cross 3; Gregg Tran 
scription Certificates for 60 and 80 words per minute 
3 ; Honors 1.2. 

True artists are a rare, rare breed. 

KURT K ON* RAD 

East Weymouth — College Course Porkey 
Camera Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Projection Club 3; Class 
Prophecy Chairman 4; Basketball 4; Senior Play 
Lighting 1, 2. 3, 4; High Honors 1, 2, 4; Honors 3. 
Good humor is his stock in trade. 

LISBETH KOOPMAN 

North Weymouth — Business Course Lambie 
Senior Play 4; Glee Club 1, 2; Class Prophecy 4; 
Junior Decorating Committee 3; Musical Revue 2; 
Book Room Duty 3, 4; Active Junior Red Cross 3, 4; 
Gregg Transcription Certificates for 60 and 80 words 
per minute 3; for 100 and 120 words 4; Home Room 
Spelling Bee Champion 4; Honorary Member of the 
Monday Club 4; High Honors 1, 2. 3, 4. 

Talented in every way. 

BARBARA KMPLAST 

North Weymouth — General Course Barb 
Boosters' Club 4; Who's Who 4; Honors 1. 4. 
// laughter were contagious, she would be 
quarantined. 

ROBERT LANEAU 

South Weymouth — General Course Bob, Spook 

Graduation Clothing 4; Wrestling 2, 3, 4; Lunch 
Room Duty 2, 3; Fire Drill Duty 2, 3, 4. 

/ can resist everything, except temptation. 



FILOMENA LaROCCO 

East Weymouth — College Course Filly 
Boosters' Club 4; Nominating Committee 3; Class 
Motto 4; Lunch Room Duty 1, 2. 3. 

Watch out for the twinkle in her eycl 

PHILLIS LARSON 

North Weymouth — Business Course Phil 

Glee Club 2; Graduation Clothing 4. 

A good ivorker, a better sport, and yet a better friend. 



LEONARD LASKEY 

South Weymouth — College Course Lcuni • 

Senior Play Properties 4. 

His modesty is a cloak which covers his ability. 

VERONICA LEE 

North Weymouth — Business Course Ronnie 

Spanish Club 2; Usher at Senior Concert 4. 

We know little of thee but what we know is good. 



MADELINE LELVVELI) 

' South Weymouth — Business Course Maddy 
Christmas Party 4; Home Room Messenger 1. 
She is gentle, she is shy, but there is mischief in 
her eye. 

VIRIGINA LEVAAS 

Weymouth Landing — Business Course Ginney 
Junior Decorating 3; Usher at Senior Play 4. 
We wonder whether she can cook. 



ROBERT LINDQUIST 

East Weymouth Auto Repair Course Bob 
Class Outing 4. 

lie didn't say I had to stay, so I'm going home. 

BARBARA LOUD 

North Weymouth— College Course Barb 
Class Secretary 3, 4; Student Council 2, 3, Vice- 
President 4; Cheerleader 3. 4; Softball 3; Girls' 
Track 3; Home Room Spelling Bee Champion 1. 
A source of heart trouble. 



ELEANOR LOUD 

South Weymouth — Home Economics (College) 

El, Elic 

Class History 4; Senior Play Properties 4; Sewing 
Room Messenger 1; Cooking Room Messenger 2; 
Library Assistant r, 2, 3, 4; Lunch Room Worker 

1, 2, 3, 4; Home Room Spelling Bee Champion 3; 
Home Nursing Certificate 2; Honors 1, 4. 

She will go a long way on the road of success. 

JOHN LYNCH 

East Weyouth — Auto Repair Course Lynchie 
To try is to succeed. 

ROBERT LYONS 

Weymouth Landing — College Course Sid, Bob 

Hand 1, 2. 3, 4; Orchestra 1, 2; French Club 3; 
Class History 4; Track 2, 3, 4; High Honors 1, 

2. 3. 4- 

The more he does, the more he can do. 

WILLIAM MacDONALD 

East Weyouth— Cabinet Making Course Bill, Mac 
Vice President 4; Scenery for Musical Revue 1 and 
Senior Play 1, 2. 

Oh, don't be foolish! Of course, I'm right. 



CHESTER MackENZIE 

East Weymouth- -Auto Repair Course Chet 
I'sher at Graduation 2; Nominating Committee 4. 
The boy with the permanent permanent. 

ISABEL MacKENZIE 

Weymouth Landing- -Business Course Issie 
Senior Banquet 4; Assistant Student Council 4; 
Gregg Transcription Certificate for 60 words a 
minute 3. 

Personality Plus. 

K.ATHRYN MADDEN 

North Weymouth — Business Course Kay 
Senior Prom 4; Drum Majorette 2. 3, 4; Musical 
Revue 2; Gregg Transcription Certificate for 60 
words a minute 3. 

Some think the world was made for fun and 

frolic, and so do I. 

SARA ANNE MAPES 

North Weymouth — College Course Sally 
Bristol Senior High School 1, 2, 3; French Club 2"; 
Orchestra 1, 2, 3; Band 1. 2. 3; Green and White 
Staff 1. 2. 3; Editor 3; Executive Committee 3; 
Gym Team 2. 3; Honors 1, 2. 3. Weymouth High 
School 4; Boosters' Club 4; Choir 4; Reflector Staff 
4; Senior Prom 4; Honors 4. 

The way to make friends is to be one. 

ELAINE MARIN 

Weymouth Landing —Business Course 
Choir 4; Usher at Senior Play 4; Gregg Tran- 
scription Certificate for 60 words per minute 3. 
Good nature is a charming virtue. 

ALLAN MASISON 

Weymouth Landing — Business Course Bud, Al 
Milton Junior High School 1; Basketball 1; Honors 
1; Weymouth High School 2. 3, 4; Cross Country 
4: Winter Track 4; Class Will 4; Honors 2, 4. 
Move back the telephone polcsl 




c^St, Page Fifty-five 




CHARLES MASISON 

Weymouth Landing- Business Course ( harhe 

Milton Junior High School t; Basketbajl i; Baseball 
i; Football i; Honors i. Weymouth High School 
2 . 3, 4; Football 2; Track 3, 4; Junior Party 3; Who's 
Who 4 ; Honors 3, 4. 

There's honesty, manhood , and (food fellowship in 
him. 

VIRIGINA M A I I SON 

Weymouth Landing- Business Course Gitwicy 
(dee Club i, 2; Musical Revue 2; Graduation 
Dance 4; Home Room Messenger 4. 

A happy-go-lucky ijirl is she. 

ROBER I McAULIFFE 

South Weymouth — Business Course Bob. Mac 

Band 1, 2. 3, 4; President of Band 4; Orchestra 
2, 3. 4; Christmas Party 4; Senior Prom 4; Track 
2. 3- 

A rare combination — musician and comedian. 

ELEANOR McCAFFERTY 

South Weymouth— College Course El 

Boosters' Club 4; Glee Club 1, 2; Choir 3, 4; 

Class Banquet 4; Nominating Committee 4; 
Musical Revue 2; Spring Concert 3, 4; Winter 

Concert 4; Christmas Party Entertainment 3, 4; 
Hotu rs 4. 

A wonderful girl — a charming voice. 

|oh\ McCarthy 

Weymouth Landing- Sheet Metal Course Johnny 
Class History 4. 

A flood worker, a flood sport, and a good friend. 

PAUL McCARl HY 

South Weymouth — College Course P J 

Band 1. 2. 3. 4; Home Room Messenger 1; Home 
Room Spelling Bee Champion 2; Graduation Dance 
4 ; Honors 4. 

He'll surprise us yet. 



Richard McCarthy 

Weymouth Landing — General Course Dick 
Class Vice-President 3, 4; Junior Party 3; Christ- 
mas Party 4; Basketball 2. 3. 4; l"sher at Grad- 
uation 3. 

What's going on this week end? 

BA R BAR A McFARLAND 

East Weymouth — Business Course Barb, Babs 

L T sher at Concert 4. 

The best are often silent. 



DOROTHY McINTOSH 

Weymouth Landing — College Course Dottie 
French Club 3; Reflector Staff 2; Class Will 1; 
Honors 3. 

She enjoys life in an easy -way. 
MARILYN McINTOSH 

East Weymouth — College Course Mai 
Reflector Staff 2. 3; French Club 3; Boosters' Club 4; 
Who's Who 4; Home Room Messenger 2; Assistant 
Student Council 4. 

Pretty to -walk -with, 

Witty to talk -with. 



|()HN McKENNA 

Lovell's Corner— Sheet Metal Course McK 
Senior Prom 4; Football 4 . 

Rest first, then work. 

CARLTON McKENZIE 

East Weymouth — College Course Carl, Mac 

Band 1. 2, 3, 4; Orchestra 1. 2. 3. 4; Senior Prom 4; 
Cross Country 4; Track 3, 4. Captain 4; Book Room 
Duty 2, 3. 4; Honors 1. 

Afoot and lightheaded. I take to the open roads. 



Page Fifty'six "Xi^ 



CFORGF. MiKINNKY 

South Weymouth Sheet Metal Course Toby 
Vocational Class President 4; Baseball 2, 4. 

/ 7cish the women would leave me alone. 

WALTER McWILLIAMS 

Rockland Printing Course Mac 
Graduation Dance 4. 

/ can't' help it- blame the offiec. 



MARY MI R I EN 

South Weymouth College Course 
French Club 3; Reflector Staff 3, 4; Nominating 
Committee 3; Class Will 4; Home Room Messenger 
2, 3; Honors t. 2, 3. 4. 

Jolly, (food naturcd, and sweet. 

Besides all these, she's clever and neat. 

ANN MICHALSKI 

East Weymouth- Business Course 

Gregg Transcription Certificate for 60 words 3; 

Honors 1. 

A bright hello at noonday, n cheery smile at night. 



PAULINE MILLER 

East Weymouth — Business Course Polly 
Reflector Staff 2. 3; Boosters' Club 4; Graduation 
Dance 4. 

A brunette, a gentleman prefers. 

HENRY MINASIAN 

East Weymouth — College Course Hank 
Class Banquet 4; Track 2, 3; Foothall 3, 4; Usher 
at Graduation 3; Honors 4. 

As fine a friend as he is an athlete. 



PHYLLIS MUHLE 

East Weymouth — Business Course Phil 
Reflector Staff 2; Glee Club 2; Home Room Messen- 
ger I, 2. 

You just can't keep her quiet. 

KENNETH MYER 

South Weymouth — General Course Ken 
What's the use of hurrying! I'll yet there. 

RICHARD NEARY 

South Weymouth — College Course Dick 
Graduation Clothing 4. 

Why aren't they all content like me? 

FRANCIS NEWCOMB 

East Weymouth- College Course Fran 
French Club 3; Reflector Staff 4; Class History 4; 
Senior Play Properties 4; Nominating Committee 3; 
Assistant Student Council 4; Cross Country 3; Win- 
ter Track 3, 4; Spring Track 2, 3, 4; Home Room 
Spelling Bee Champion 3; Honors r, 2, 3, 4. 
A little nonsense now and then is relished by the 
Zi'iscst men. 



EVELYN NEWELL 

Weymouth — Business Course Ginny 
Glee Club i; Graduation Clothing 4; Home Room 
Messenger 2; Honors 2. 

What's female beauty but an air divine. 

Through which the mind's all gentle graces 
shine. 

MARTHA NICKERSON 

East Weymouth — College Course Betty 
(jlee Club 1; Reflector Staff 1. 2, 4; French Club 3'; 
Class Prophecy 4; Head Cashier in Lunchroom 2. 3, 
4; Honorary Member of the Monday Club 4; High 
Honors 1 . 2, 3, 4. 

Work is my recreation. 




c^SV> Page Fifty-seven 




VIRGINIA NORRIS 

South Weymouth College Course Jivic 
Play Reading Committee 4 ; Junior Nominating 
Committee 3; Class Motto 4; Spelling Hoc Champion 
2; Complimentary member of Old Colony Clut) 4; 
! Conors 2. 

Beauty, personality , and wit 
Bach of these exactly fit. 

RICH \KI) O'BRIE N 

North Weymouth College Course O' Hie 

Nominating Committe 3. 4; Baseball Manager 3, 4; 
(1 1 ('mint ry 1 , 2 ; Home Koom Messenger 1 ; 
I. uncli Room Duty 2. 

I knoii< it is sin for me to sit and t/rin. 



( \ I HERINE OLI\ \ 

North Weymouth — Business Course Kay 
Home Room Messenger 1 ; Gregg Transcription 
Certificate for 00 words per minute 3. 

/ like a (food grouch when I yet one. 

M VRG VRJE I O'NEIL 

South Weymouth General Course Pvffffy 
Reflector Staff 4; Home Room Messenger 2; Fire 
Drill Duty 4; Student Council Assistant 4. 

H appy-go-lucky, everyone's friend , 
Lively the hours with her we spend. 

SHIRLEY OSBORN 

North Weymouth College Course Bonnie 
Reflector Staff -\ Glee Club I, 2; Choir 2; Class 
Will e r \ Cheerleader 2. 3, 4; Fire Drill Duty 3, 4; 
Honors 3, 4. 

Romeo, wherefore art thou? You never can be 
found. 

NANCY PAGE 

Easl Weymouth College Course Parge, Nan 

Reflector Staff 3. Editor 4; Hook Chili 3; Christmas 
Party 4; Lunch Room Duty 1; Head Cashier 2: 
Substitute Cheerleader 3; Fire Drill Duty 4; 
Honor- 1. 3, 4. 

Whatever is worth doinif at all, is worth doing 

well. 



[OHN PAPPAS 

N ith Weymouth College Course 
Senior Play 4; Class History 4; Christmas As- 
sembly 4; Honors 1. 2, 4. 

Men of few words are the best men. 

JOHN PARSONS 

N rth Abington -Auto Repair Course Jack 
Class Banquet 4. 

Why study history? I make it. 

ELIZABETH PAULSON 

North Weymouth — College Course Betty 
Senior Play 4; Orchestra 2. 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2; 
Choir 3. 4; Musical Revue 2; Christmas Assembly 
4 ; Class History 4 ; Junior Party Entertainment 2, 
3; Christmas Party Entertainment 4; Substitute 
Drum Majorette 4; Class Representative to Ameri- 
can Legion Auxiliary Girls' State at Br 1 tidewater 
State Teachers College 3; Winner of Legion 
Oratorical Contest 4. 

Music hath charm. 

VIRGINIA PEARSON 

South Weymouth— Business Course Ginn v 

Glee Club 1; Who's Who 4; (Jill's Softball 3; 
Secretary to Mr. Lyond 4; Gregg Transcription 
Certificates for 60 words per minute 3; for 80, 100 
words 4; Honors 1, 2. 4. 

Who knows what lies behind her sparkling eyes? 

ELEANOR PECKHAM 

East Weymouth — Business Course Pickles 
Graduation Clothing 4; Baseball 2, 3, 4; Student 
Council Assistant 4; Lunch Room Duty 2. 

A little time for laughter, 

|()M\ PECORARO 

E; st Weymouth — -Busines Course Pickles 
( iradualion Clothing 4; Baseball 2, 3. 4 ; Student 
Council Assistant 4; Lunch Room Duty 2. 
Nothing is .more valuable to a mam than courtesy. 



Page Fifty-eight 



JOSEPH PEPE 

East Weymouth- — Printing Course Joe 
Christms Party 4; Senior Prom 4. 

Did you say, "Quiet" ? 

DOROTHY PERETT 

East Weymouth Business Course Dottle 
Glee Club 1; Who's Who 4; Home Room Messenger 
3; Spelling Bee Champion 3; Secretary to Mr. 
Nelson 4; Gregg Transcription Certificates for 60, 
80 words per minute 3 ; 1 00 words per minute 4 ; 
Honors 3, 4. 

The blush is but the outward expression of the inner 
self. 

JEANNE PERROW 

East Weymouth — College Course 

French Club 3 ; Nominating Committee 4 ; Junior 
Party 3; Honors 1, 3, 4. 

Our patience will achieve more than our force. 

HELOISE PIKE 

Weymouth — College Course IVcasie 
French Club 3; Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4; Choir 3; Glee 

Club 1, 2; Musical Revue 2; Christmas Assembly 4; 

Home Room Messenger 2; Class Outing 4; Honors 
3; High Honors 4. 

/ judge people by what they might be, not are, 
nor will be. 



MARTHA POLSON 

South Weymouth — College Course 
Class Prophecy 4; Honors 1. 

To her xvill come the best in life, because to life she 
(fives her best. 

BARBARA PRATT 

Nort* 1 Weymouth — -Business Course Barb 
Gregg Transcription Certificate for 60 words per 
minute 3. 

A constant friend is rare and hard to find. 

SHIRLEY PRATT 

South Weymouth-— General Course Skirl 
Class Banquet 4; Junior High Office 4; Home Room 
Spelling Bee Champion 2. 

To mourn a mischief that is past and gone is the real 
zvay to draw nczv mischief on. 

GENEVIEVE RAUCH 

Weymouth — College Course J ennie, Gen 

Choir 4; Glee Club 1; Class History 4; Play Reading 
Committee 4 ; Christmas Party Entertainment 4 ; 
Christmas Assembly 4; Home Room Messenger 1; 
Honors 1 , 2, 4. 

Her golden hair reflects her golden disposition. 

PHYUSS RAYMOND 

East Weymouth- — Business Course Phil 
Usher at Winter Concert 4; Gregg Transcription 
Certificates for 60 words per minute 3; for 80, 100 
and 120 words per minute 4; Secretary to Mr. 
Gutterson 4; Honors 2, 3, 4. 

On her and on her high endeavor. 
The light of praise shall shine forever. 

JOHN REI1) 

Weymouth — College Course Harry 
Senior Prom 4; Football 2; Baseball 3. 

He that hath knowledge sparcth his words. 

MARGARET REIDY 

East Weymouth — College Course 

Reflector Staff 3; Class Motto 4; Drum Majorette 

3; Home Room Spelling Bee Champion 1. 

Pep, personality, and wit, 

Each of these exactly fit. 

VIRGINIA RENNIE 

South Weymouth — Business Course Ginny 

Senior Prom 4. 

Happy am I, from care J am free, 
And when you hear a giggle, you'll knozv 
it's me. 








V J 




wmf firm 

' / /, 









SHIRLEY RIDEOU1 

Eas1 Weymouth Cabinet making Course 
Who's Who 4; Scenery for Senior Play 2. 
Our hats arc off to the first lady in our school f t 
having led us all of the way. 

JOHN RIES 

East Weymouth- -College Course Jack 
Class Prophecy 4; Intramural Football i', Basket- 
ball [, 2, 3; Home Room Messenger 3, 4; Lunch 
Room Duty 2. 

I he gentleman ladies prefer. 



DONALD ROBERTS 

Weymouth Agriculture Course lluuty 
Home Room Messenger i. 
'Tis the fanner's care that makes the field bear. 



ELIZABETH ROBERTS 

Weymouth Business Course 

A laughing eye, a merry smile. 
Will always make a girl worthwhile. 



Bett v 



\R I HI R ROBINSON 

South Weymouth— College Course Art 
Class History 4; Cross Country 4; Honors 4. 

There is no great genius without a 

tincture of madness. 

PATRICK ROBINSON 

East Weymouth — General Course Pat 
Track 3 ; Cross Country 3. 

A little work, a little play. 

No homework — a perfect day. 



MARGARET ROCKWOOD 

East Weymouth — Business Course 
Gregg Transcription Certificates for 60 and So 
words per minute 3; for 100 and 120 words per 
minute 4; Secretary to Miss Skala 4; Honors 1, 3. 
4 ; High Honors 2. 

A loving heart is the beginning of all knowledge. 

ANN ROGERS 

East Weymouth Business Course 

Mount Saint Joseph Academy 1. 2; Basketball 1, 

Captain 2; Choir 1, 2; Weymouth High School 3. 4; 

Christmas Party 4. 

When Ann's around we hare lot sof fun, 
But never get our homework done. 

WALTER ROWELL 

Weymouth — General Course Red 
Ladies, beware this man with red hair. 



JOHN SAFERIAN 

East Weymouth — Printing Course Dick 
First Sergeant, Iironze Star Award, United States 
Army. 

Service above self. 



DEWEY SANTA CROCE 

East Weymouth — College Course Dcwar, 
Glee Club 1; Graduation Dance 4; Spring 
1, 2, 3, 4; Winter Track 2, 3. 4; Football 3, 4. 
When Dewey's not there to entertain. 



Mike 
Track 



218 



t be the same. 



GEORGE SARGENT 

South Weymouth — General Course 
Wrestling 4. 

He worries not, he hurries not, his calm is undis- 
turbed. 



Page Sixty ^VS^ 



VIRGINIA SCIOSCIA 

East Weymouth lousiness Course (Unity 

(Uce Cluli j; Choir 3. 

Although she looks (/en tic and shy. 
There's a twinkle of mischief in her eye. 

RUSSELL SHAW 

Weymouth— College Course Huss 
Senior Play 4; Class Prophecy 4; Orchestra 1. 3, 1: 
Home Room Spelling Bee Champion 1, Honors 1 
2, 3. 4- 

Music is well said to be the speech of the angels. 



ROBERT SHEPHERD 

Smith Weymouth- General Course Bob 
Kami 1, 2. 3; Track 1. 

/ have fought a yood fight, I have finished my course, 
I have kept faith. 

ELIZABETH SHOR I 

North Weymouth Business Course Betty 
Senior Prom 4; Gregg Transcription Certificate for 
60 and 80 words a minute 3; for 100 words a minute 
4; Secretary to Miss Stockwell 4. 

Her sparkling eyes have won us all. 



HARRY SLOAT 

South Weymouth Auto Repair Course Sloatic 
Class Will 4. 

Sometimes I sit and think and sometimes I just sit. 

DARRELL SMITH 

South Weymouth — Cabinet Making Course 

Red, Smitty 

Senior Play 4; Choir 2. 4; Graduation Clothing 4; 
Junior Decorating 2; Scenery for Musical Revue 1; 
Spring Track 4; Home Room Collector 2. 4. 

He would have spent more, but that's all she had. 



EILEEN SMITH 

East Weymouth — College Course Smitty 
Class Prophecy 4; Nominating Committee 3; Honors 
4- 

A tiood heart is better than all the heads in the world. 
[ESSIE SMI TH 

North Weymouth — Business Course Jess 
Gregg Transcription Certificates for 60 words per 
minute 3, for 80 and 100 words per minute 4; Secre- 
tary to Mr. Lyons 2, 3, 4; Honors 1, 3; High 
Honors 2. 

True to her word, her work, and her friends. 



KATHRYN SMITH 

Weymouth — Business Course Kay 
Junior Party 3; Usher at Winter Concert 4; Grad- 
uation Dance 4; (Iregg Transcription Certificates for 
60 and 80 words per minute 3; for 100 words per 
minute 4. 

Personality is the first runy up the ladder of success. 

ARTHUR S PR AG UK 

South Weymouth College Course Buster 
Freshman Football 1 ; Track 4. 

Begone, dull care! Thou and I shall never agree. 



LUCIA STAGLIOLA 

East Weymouth College Course Stay, Chickie 
French Club 3: Book Club 3; Lunch Room Duty 1; 
Honors 4. 

It is a friendly heart that has many friends. 

DAVID STEPHENSON 

North Weymouth — College Course Dave, Steve 
High Honors 3. 4; Honors 1. 2. 
A mind full of knowledge is a mind that never 
fails. 




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V 





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It : ' 


4 


]'7 




<r^Vj Page Sixty'one 



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I i 


1 1!) 


A ! 






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\ \ * * * » 1 







[EAN M EVENS 

North Weymouth General Course StCVXC, Sis 

Baseball r, 2; Basketball 1. a, 3; Graduation Dance 

4- 

/i winning smile (joes a long way. 

ROBER1 MM I 

North Weymouth — General Course Bob 
Track 1, 3, 4; Class Will Chairman 4; Class Marshal 
4- 

The crowd (jives way before his stride. 



DON ALD S r. PE1 ER 

East Weymouth — Business Course Dun 
Talking comes by nature; silence by wisdom 

CAROLYN STRAI I 

North Weymouth — Business Course Carol 
Class Prophecy 4; Gregg Transcription Certificate 
for (m» and So words per minute 3, for 100 and 120 
words 4; Home Room Spelling liee Champion 1; 
Secretary to Mr. Gutterson 4: Student Council 
Assistant 4 ; High Honors 2, 3 ; Honors 1 , 4. 
The gentle mind by gentle deeds is known. 



GRACE SULLIVAN 

East WeymoUth— General Course 

Glee Club 1; Class Outing 4; Usher at Senior 

Play 4. 

No gems nor gold she needs to wear 
She shines intrinsically fair. 

RICHARD SWAN 

South Weymouth College Course Dick, Diver 
Hand 3, 4; Orchestra 3, 4; Reflector Staff 4; 
Senior Prom Chairman 4; Wrestling 2, 3, 4, Cap- 
tain 4; Hook Room Duty 1, 2, 3. 4. 

Clothes make the man. 



GLORIA SWANSON 

Weymouth Landing — Business CoufSe Glo 
Reflector Statf 4; Gregg Transcription Certificate 
for 60 words per minute 3. 

Winning each heart and delighting each eye. 

DONALD SYBERTZ 

North Weymouth — College Course 
Class Motto 4; Baseball 2, 3, 4. 

A fine sport in everything he does. 



(LAN TAKER 

North Weymouth — Business Course 
Class History 4; Gregg Transcription Certificate 
for 60 and 80 words per minute 3; for 100 words 
4; Usher at Senior Play 4; Honors 3. 

Liked by all who know her. 

PA I RICIA TAYLOR 

North Weymouth — Business Course Pat 
Senior Prom 4; Gregg Transcription Certificate for 
60 words per minute 3; Home Room Spelling Bee 
Champion 3. 

A laughing eye, a merry smile. 

Tend to make a girl worth-while. 

RICHARD TAYLOR 

South Weymouth— Agricultural Course Dick 
Graduation Clothing 4; Honors r, 2, 3, 4. 

Few words, much ability. 

DORICE THOMPSON 

East Weymouth — Business Course Dottie 
Reflector Staff 3; Who's Who 4; Gregg Tran- 
scription Certificate for 60 and 80 words per minute 
3, 100 words 4; Secretary to Mr. Martin 4; Work 
in Print Shop 3 ; Honors 2. 

A good secretary is a great asset. 



Page Sixty'two c \&^ 



RI I A I IGHE 

Soul h Weymouth Business Course Dita 
Gregg Transcription Certificate for 60 words per 
minute 3. 

Everyone can have a friend, 
Who knotvs how to be a friend, 

NORMAN TIRRELL 

East Weymouth— Sheet Metal Course Norm 
Class History 4; Lunch Room Duty 4. 

What's the use of hurrying? 



ROBERT TITUS 

South Weymouth — General Course Bob, Myrtc 
A penny for your thoughts. 

HELEN TOOMEY 

East Weymouth — College Course 

French Club .i ; Hook Club 3; Reflector Staff 3, 4; 
Who's Who 4; Home Room Messenger 2; Honors 
1, 2; High Honors 3, 4. 

My mind to me a kindom is; 

Such perfect joy therein I find. 



AUGUSTUS TRASK 

South Weymouth — College Course Gus 
Is he always so quiet? I wonder — 

MARY TRASK 

South Weymouth — General Course 
Messenger for Miss Benson 2; Home Room Mes- 
senger 3; Graduation Clothing 4; Senior Play 
Property Committee 4; Red Cross Hume Nursing 
Certificate 2. 
There arc some silent people zvho are more in- 
teresting than the best talkers. 



PHYLLIS VACHON 

Weymouth Landing — General Course L iu-is 

Senior Play 4; Senior Prom 4; Musical Revue 2. 

Her friends— she has many 

Her foes— has she any? 

MARION VAILLANCOl R I 

East Weymouth— General Course 
Easthampton High School 1, 2, 3; Weymouth High 
School 4; Hand 2, 3; Orchestra 2, 3; Glee Club 1. 3; 
Freshman Reception 2, 3; Junior Party 3; Junior 
Senior Prom 3; Cheerleader 3; Dramatic Cluh 3; 
Gregg Transcription Certificate for 60 words per 
minute 3; Fashion Club 3; Sophomore Party 2; 
Usher at Senior Play 2. 

Although she is new, 

She's a friend good and true. 

LESTER VENO 

East Weymouth — College Course Les 
Nominating Committee 3. 4; Graduation Clothing 4; 
Junior Varsity Football 3; Track 1, 3, 4; Honors 1. 3. 
Rest first; then -work. 

JOHN YKRGOBBI 

Weymouth Heights — General Course Verge, Bob 
Play Reading Committee 4; Class Banquet 4; Wrest- 
ling 1, 2. 3; Footlial I 3, 4; Student Council Assist- 
ant 4. 

He who invented work should have finished it. 

LEO WARD 

Weymouth Landing — Sheet Metal Course 
Class Banquet 4. 

/ wish I zverc as smart as I am handsome. 

VIRGINIA WATSON 

Weymouth — Business Course Gitmy 
Reflector Staff 1, 2, 3. 4; Nominating Committee 3. 
4; Class Banquet 4; Gregg Transcription Certificate 
for 60 words a minute 3; Honors 1, 2. 
To her will come the finest things in life, because to 
life she gives the best. 







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c^V» Page Sixty'three 




PRISCILLA WEBB 

East Wevmouth- General Course Pete 
Clee Chili 2; Christmas Party 4; Graduation Dance 
4; Usher at Concert 4; Home Room Messenger 1; 
Lunch Room Duty 2; (Jregg Transcription Certifi 
cate for 60 words per minute 3. 

A fair exterior is a silent recommendation. 

DONALD W H I I I I MORI 

South Weymouth College Course Don. Whittic 
Hand 3, 4; Orchestra 3. 4; Class Prophecy 4; Track 
3. 4; Baseball 3; Cross Country 4; Honors [. 
Anything for a quiet life. 



RICHARD WHI I I LE 

Weymouth Landing College Course Dick 
Hand 1. 2. 3, 4; Orchestra 3. 4; Model Manners 1: 
Class Will 4; Track 3; Lighting 1, 2, 3; Home Room 
Spelling Bee Champion 3; Honors 1,2. 3. 4. 

Wisdom is the wealth of the wise. 



BEVERLY WRIGH I 

East Weymouth— College. Course BeV 
(ilee Club 2; Class Prophecy 4; Home Room Mes- 
senger 2 ; Honors 1 . 

The sunshine of her laughter penetrates our (/loom. 



VERNA WRIGHT 

East Weymouth— liusincss Course 
Reflector Staff 3; Class Will 4; I'sher at Concert 4; 
Lunch Room Duty 1 ; (Iregg Transcription Certificate 
for 60 and 80 words per minute 3; Secretary to Mr. 
Ghiorse 4; Honors 2. 

A good sport, a loyal friend. 

A worker on whom you can depend. 

EDWARD WYSOCKI 

North Wevmouth-- Agricultural Course Eddie, Why 
(.lee Club 1. 

Behold a dancer! 



FRANK YAGER 

Kingston — Auto Repair Course Yager 
Graduation Clothing 4. 

Never take life seriously. 



Page Sixty'four 'Xj^' 



SCHOOL 
ACTIVITIES 



First Row: F. Aiello, H. Toomey, Miss Chase, F. Newcomb. B. Kilburn, N. Page, R. Swan. Mr. Brown. Mr. 
Steele, H. Keblis, S. Osborn, ; Second Row: L. Gould, E. Stein. A. Sheehan, V*. Horsch, C. Fryer, P. 
Fargo, B. LaMontagne, .M Merten, M. Nickerson, K. Thornberg, N. Butler; Third Row: V. Watson, G. 
Swanson, J. Bentley, M. Gourley, S. Mapes, J. Walsh, K. Weeks, C. Hansen, E. Kezer, B. Jordan, E. 
Anderson; Fourth Row: D. Beazley, B. MacDonnell, R. Jordan, J. Barker, M. Corey, J. Chase, G. Rogers, 
W. LeVangie. 



JIhe Reflector, which is issued four times a year, is the publication of the 
pupils who form the Reflector staff assisted by Mr. Prescott Brown, Miss Helen 
Chase, Mr. James Steele, and Mr. Harry Duncan. We of the staff wish to thank 
these teachers, the pupils, and the printing department of the Vocational School 
for their helpful and generous assistance in making each publication possible. 
We have tried to make each issue as interesting as possible by choosing the 
highest grade material submitted by the pupils. 

We extend our best wishes for success to next year's staff and hope they find 
as much pleasure in their work as we have in the past. 



Page Sixty'Six 



REFLECTOR 





First Row: Joseph Dalto, Helen Andersson, Margaret Kelly, Edmund Caracciolo, Barbara Loud, Frank Aiello, 
Helen Casciani; Second Row: Richard Rosa, George Bicknell, Jacqueline Pitts, Jean Walsh, Richard Caruso 
James McCarthy. 



STUDENT COUNCIL 



T 



he Student Council is the Student Government of Weymouth High School, li 
consists of twenty members, five from each class, who are nominated and elected 
by the student body. It is their duty to maintain law and order in the lunch-room, 
corridors, and at fire drills. 

The Assistant Student Council members are also chosen by the student body. 
On December 7, 1945 the Student Council sponsored a Victory Dance, music 
being provided by Jimmy Rago and his orchestra. 
The officers of 1945-46 are: 

Edmund Caracciolo, President 
Barbara Loud, Vice-President 
Margaret Kelly, Secretary 
To the future members of the Student Council we extend our most sincere 
wishes for success. 



Seniors 
Frank Aiello 
Helen Andersson 
Edmund Caracciolo 
Margaret Kelly 
Barbara Loud 



Juniors 
Donald Almquist 
Richard Caruso 
Helen Casciani 
Joseph Dalto 
James McCarthy 



Sophomores 
George Bicknell 
Jacquelyn Pitts 
Richard Rosa 
William Tooze 
Jean Walsh 



c^V» Page Sixty'seven 



First Row: Mr. Jack, C. Palmer, V. Gauley, A. Brown, P. Weeks, R. Lyons, S. Shepherd, F. Johnson, 
W. Jackson, F. Butler, D. Resniek, D. Swan, C. Stone, R. Holbrook, D. Whittemore, T. Fisher. R. Peterson. 
R. Karnan, D. Pelrine, R. Coletti. J. Shaw, R. Marr. E. Kezer; Second Row: E. Paulson, P. Berry, P. 
McCarthy, P. Shepherd, C. McKenzie, P. Hanifan, N. dimming, C. Bergfors, B. Burrell, A. King, W. 
Thayer, A. Summers, S. Mathews, H. McGlynn, M. Pearson, R. Lewis, B. Bussiere. J. Austin, R. Bowes, 
P. Pingree; Third Row: L. Simonds, R. Madden, J. Delahunt, J. Cosgrove. J. Hall, R. Leites, J. Rathgeb, 
J. Kilburne, E. Remondini, F. Boraks, W. Mills, H. Speck, W. Sloan. R. McAuliffe. P. Spallino, R. Whittle, 
S. Lynch, R. Thayer, A. Greene; Fourth Row: B. Jordan, R. Fitts. G. Sylvester, G. Rogers, J,. Nevins, A. 
Clow, E. Acorn, J. Imlach, C. Thompson, L. Boyle, C. Stebbins, W. Smith, R. Cass, W. Alisffn, E. Tierney, 
M. Paone. 



BAND 



The Weymouth High School Band, under the capable baton of Mr. Russell Jack, 
has ended a most successful season. 

The activities of the band varied. The group played at assemblies and was 
present at a great many of the football games during the fall. Also the band partici- 
pated in two highly praised concerts in January and in May. The success of these 
concerts was partly due to the good selection of the music by the director, Mr. Jack. 

Robert McAuliffe was chosen student band master during the year. 

Our hats are off to the future musicians of Weymouth High. 



MEMBERS OE THE BAND 



Clarinets 

Joan Austin 
Robert Bowes 
Alma Brown 
Beverly Bussiere 
Francis Butler 
Ralph Coletti 
Thomas Fisher 
Virginia Gauley 
Raymond Holbrook 
William Jackson 
Francis Johnson 
Richard Karnan 
Richard Lewis 
Robert Lyons 
Robert Marr 
Charleen Palmer 
Donald Pelrine 
Roy Peterson 
David Resniek 
John Shaw 
Shirley Shepherd 
Clayton Stone 
Patricia Weeks 
Donald Whittemore 



Cornets 
Elaine Acorn 
Franklin Boraks 
Leo Boyle 
[oh n Cosgrove 
John Delahunt 
Robert Fitts 
Jerome Kilburne 
Robert Leites 
Richard Madden 
Robert McAuliffe 
Marjorie Pearson 
Janice Rathgeb 
William Sloan 
William Smith 
Richard Thayer 
Richard Whittle 

Drums 
Jack Hall 
Paul McCarthy 
Joseph Nevins 
Gardiner Rogers 
Gilman Sylvester 



Trombones 
Roy Cass 
Shirley Lynch 
Philip Spallino 
Harvey Speck 
Charles Stebbins 
Edward Tierney 

Saxophones 
Carl Bergfors 
Bruce Burrell 
Natalie dimming 
Paul Hanifan 
Robert King 
Carlton McKenzie 
Philip Shepherd 

Alto Horn 
James Imlach 

Bass Horn 
William Mills 



Flutes 

William Alison 
Sally Mathews 
Helen McGlynn 

Oboes 

Richard Summers 
William Thayer 

Timpani 
Albert Sheehan 

Bass Drum 
Richard Swan 

Glockenspiel 

Carolyn Thompson 

French Horn 
Albert Clow 

Baritone Horn 
Philip Berry 



Page Sixty-eight 




First Row: (Left to Right) C. McKenzie, R. King, R. Shaw, H. Pike, R. Whittle, R. McAuliffe, E. Paulson, S. 
Shepherd, A. Daniele, D. Whittemore, R. Holbrook ; Second Row: A, Sheehan, E. Remondini, R. Swan, B. Burrell, 
R. Benedict, B. Brown, S. Lynch, E. Wardwell. F. Payne, L. Egon. P. Hanifan; Third Row: W. Mills, E. Tiernev, 
R. Bayers, S. Anderson. R. Summers, F. Butler, W. Jackson, T. Fishef, W. Alison; Back Row: T. Petze, j. 
Delahunt, W. Thayer, VV. Sloan, R. Fitts, D. Cain, S. Mathews, C. Palmer, M. Pearson, G. Rogers. 



ORCHESTRA 



The orchestra completed its season by taking part in the annual Spring Concert. 
During the school year these student musicians also participated in the Winter 
Concert and furnished many selections at the Senior Play. 

With the addition of many new members, the orchestra is becoming more 
balanced and great improvements are forthcoming. 

Our gratitude is extended to Mr. Jack and all members of the organization as 
well as our wish for success in years years to come. 



MEMBERS OE THE ORCHESTRA 



Fiisl Violins 
Robert Fitts 
William Mills 
Heloise Pike 
Russell Shaw 

Second Violins 
Ruth Bayers 
Ruth Benedict 
David Cain 
Lars Egon 
Francis Payne 
Joan Whiteside 



Flu les 

William Alison 
Sally Mathews 



Oboes 

Richard Summers 
William Thayer 



Trombones 
Shirley Lynch 
Edward Tierney 

Clarinets 

Francis Butler 
Thomas Fisher 
Raymond Holbrook 
William Jackson 
Carlton McKenzie 
Charleen Palmer 
Shirley Shepherd 
Donald Whittemore 



Cornets 

Robert McAuliffe 
Marjorie Pearson 
William Sloan 
Richard Whittle 



Bass 

Harlan Stone 

Tim pant 
Albert Sheehan 

Saxofihones 
Bruce Burrell 
Paul Hanifan 
Robert King 

liass Drum 

Richard Swan 



Drums 

Thomas Petze 
Gardiner Rogers 

Piano 

Judith Anderson 
Betsy Brown 
Anthony Daniele 
Elizabeth Paulson 

French Horn 
Albert Clow 

Cello 

Elinor Wardwell 

Librarians 

fohn Delahunt 
Nancy Cain 
Ernest Remondini 



c^V, Page Sixty-nine 




First Row: E. Barker, J. Kenney, D. Robinson, li. James, J. Lysakowski, S. Mathews. N. Cain P. '.Vecks, 
C. Thompson, J. Anderson, J. McGoldrick, E. Paulson, N. Duncan. B. Smith; Second Row: S. .Mapes, G. 
Ranch, E. McCafferty, C. Loomis, P. Pitcher. P. Farr, D. Chellis, C. Fryer, C. Corridan, M. Abbo.t. E. Martin, J. 
Pracejus, E. Stein, E. Anderson; Third Row: L. Nyberg, W. Mills, F. Butler, R. Macri, D. Hanna- 
ford, P. Foster, S. Rushton, J. Alison, C. Reed, P. Doble, D. Smith; Fourth Row: T. Pappageorge, J. 
Bagdadlian, P. Frye, E. Remondini, J. Wolfert, H. Bland, P. Shepherd, W. Tirrell, C. Holbrook, \V. Tooze. 



CHOIR 



The Weymouth High School Choir ended its second successful year under the new- 
director, Mr. Jack, with a spring concert in which the orchestra and choir together 
performed well-known selections. 

This past year has been a busy one for the choir. Besides the spring concert 
there were also the winter concert and a performance given for the Monday Club. 

Six members of the choir, along with seven members from the orchestra and 
band, went to New Britain, Connecticut, where the New England Festival, the 
first since the close of the war, was held. Members of bands, orchestras, and choirs 
from all over New England were assembled there, and even though the work was 
tiring, everyone enjoyed himself. 

Bigger and better plans in regard to the choir ate being made for next year. 



Page Seventy *X&^ 



First Row: P. Vachon, R. Shaw, H. Keblis, R. Karnan, E. Paulson, C. Corridan, Miss Chase; Second Row: 
V. Kalajian, M. Abbott, J. Pappas, D. Smith, L. Koopman, J. Casey, E. Dewey. 



^V-Zn February 15, the Senior Class presented the three-act play "Every Family 
Has One," a delightful comedy of family life in these United States. Miss Helen 
Chase directed the production. 

The plot centres round the Reardon family, whose eccentricities are hi- 
larious. The problem of the three Reardon children, Marcia, Penelope, and 
Warry, provide many amusing moments, but a wise grandmother leaves her 
Bing Crosby records long enough to straighten everything out. 



SENIOR PLAY 



Penelope Reardon 
Laura Reardon 
Mrs. James Parker 
Essie 

Nana Reardon 
Reginald Reardon 
Marcia Reardon 
Warry Reardon 
Mr. Parker 
Sherwin Parker 
Lily Reardon 
Todd Galloway 



Carolyn Corridan 
Elizabeth Paulson 



Virginia Kalajian 



Marjorie Abbott 



Phyllis Vachon 
Darrell Smith 
Helen Keblis 
James Casey 
John Pappas 
Russell Shaw 



Lisbeth Koopman 



Robert Karnan 



c^V» Page Seventyone 



First Row: Gerry Sullivan, Henry Boucher, Dick Liva, Jim Coveney, Bruce Hunt, John Gallian, Dick Gould, 
Ralph Jackson, Rex Fenderson, Jim Duca; Second Row: Coach Paul Sweeney, Joe Dalto, Dewey Santacroce, 
John Baumeister, Henry Minasian, John Bennet, Fred Loud, Bill Mcintosh, Bill Leone, Neil Doherty; Third 
Row: Bob Schuler, Dick Sherwood, Joe McKenna, Walter Newcomb, Ed Caracciolo, Bob Warren, Ed Adams, 
George Bicknell, Coach Bob Orlando. 



-1 his year's football team certainly had its share of tough breaks and ups and 
downs. Although Weymouth started off with a bang in polishing off Rindge Tech, 
the next four games spread gloom throughout Maroontown for Belmont, Brook- 
line, Quincy, and North Quincy all grabbed wins from Weymouth. Undaunted, 
however, Weymouth leaped back to the victory list by smashing Cambridge Latin 
and Dedham. Next Brockton and Arlington, two of the better class A teams, were 
forced to fight for every inch as they got by Weymouth. Then Thanksgiving Day 
came and with it one of the best Hingham elevens of the past few years. No team 
had scored more than one touchdown against them, and they had decided it was 
about time to beat Weymouth. The Maroons had other ideas, though, as they 
battled their way to a thrilling 12 to 6 victory for Coach Paul Sweeney, who was 
watching his last game as Weymouth's football coach. 

The Record: 



FOOTBALL 




Weymouth 19 
Weymouth 
Weymouth 6 
Weymouth 
Weymouth 
Weymouth 28 
Weymouth 
Weymouth 31 
Weymouth 7 
Weymouth 12 



Rindge Tech 
Belmont 7 
Brookline 31 
North Quincy 25 
Quincy 26 

Cambridge Latin 18 
Arlington 14 
Dedham 6 
Brockton 18 
Hingham 6 



Page Seventy>two *\J^> 





H ^ f "is"- 



Seated: Dick McCarthy, Dick Caruso, Tony Daniele, Kurt Konrad; Standing: Manager Bill Mcintosh, Eddie 
Caracciolo, Henry Boucher, Jimmy Duca, Coach Jack Gannon. 



BASKETBALL 



^Wih a scarcity of veterans, Coach Jack Gannon produced a basketball squad 
that could dish it out as well as take it. Every game of this six wins and eight 
losses season provided the fans with action and thrills. Features of the year were 
a lopsided Hingham defeat, a close call over North Quincy, and the game that 
made the whole South Shore sit up and take notice — that is the upset of the 
now class B champions of the state, Rockland. This was Rockland's only Mass- 
achusetts defeat, Weymouth's biggest victory. 



The Record: 

Weymouth 28 
Weymouth 38 
Weymouth 34 
Weymouth 57 
Weymouth 30 
Weymouth 30 
Weymouth 28 
Weymouth 39 
Weymouth 33 
Weymouth 38 
Weymouth 41 
Weymouth 33 
Weymouth 56 
Weymouth 34 



Rockland 37 
Milton 19 
Brockton 47 
Hingham 12 
Braintree 44 
North Quincy 36 
Quincy 38 
Brockton 64 
Quincy 51 
North Quincy 36 
Hingham 28 
Rockland 30 
Milton 40 
Braintree 56 



c^V. Page Seventy-three 



First Row: A. Landis, R. O'Brien, R. Goodspeed; Second Row: J. Pecoraro, A. Dewey, J. Brady, A. Jones, 
R. Amalnle. F. Aiello, D. Sybertz, G. McKinney, J. Coyle, D. Whittemore. R. Karstunen; Third Row: Coach 
H. Arlanson, R. DeVito, W. Mcintosh, F. Loud, K. Munroe. J. Daly, R. Liva, J. Coveney. VV. Brady; Forth 
Row: H. Rago, W. Leone, E. Kearns, A. Cardinal, E. DeLuca, M. Walsh, R. Walbridge, C. Barcelo, V. 
Stokje, N. Russo. 

BASEBALL 

^C>rack! comes the sound of bat against ball as Weymouth drives out another 
hit. Yes, the baseball team is making a name for itself this year. Up to date 
the maroons have four straight victories won from North Quincy, Quincy, 
Braintree, and Milton. 

Back from the war and out of the United States Navy is Coach Harry 
Arlanson. Under his capable eyes the candidates for the baseball team played 
many inter-squad games, giving him a chance to see what everyone could do 
and therefore form the best first team. 
This team now includes: 

John Coyle, Pitcher 

Kenneth Munroe, Pitcher 

Jack Brady, Catcher 

Bud Daly, First Base 

John Pecoraro, Second Base 

Fred Loud, Third Base 

Jimmy Coveney, Right Field 

Ralph Amabile, Centre Field 

Dick Liva, Left Field 

Don Sybertz, Short Stop 



Page Seventy'four 




Front Row: Robert Cunniff, Lawrence Dwyer; Second Row: Frank Aiello, Gerald Hackett, John Bennett, Richard 
Swan (Captain), Robert Claflin, Edward DeLuca; Third Row: Robert Laneau (Manager), Gregory Macri 
(Junior Manager;) George Sargent, Donald St. Peter, Darrel Wicken, Sam Christie, Sherman Rushton, Coach 
James Steele. 



WRESTLING 

^^restling, coached by Mr. Steele, gained popularity this year by leaps and 
bounds. In eight exciting matches the Weymouth grapplers polished off Per- 
kins Institute twice, Needham twice, and Worcester Academy once, while bowing 
to Andover, Exeter and Milton Academy. Crowds of fans (especially girls) 
were attracted to the home contests to see such muscle men as "Ripper" Ben- 
nett and Captain "Diver" Swan in action. They were well rewarded by seeing 
Bennett, a junior, add to his last year's string of wins to make it thirteen straight. 

The first team consisted of: 

110 lb. Class — Dick Swan, captain 

121 lb. Class — Jack Bennett, captain-elect 

128 lb. Class — Gerry Hackett 

135 lb. Class — Don St. Peter, Bob Boudreault 

145 lb. Class — Herb Claflin 

155 lb. Class — Joe DiLorenzo 

165 lb. Class — Mike LaRocco 



c"^!t» Page Seventy'five 




Front Row: Robert Stitt, Francis Newcomb, Richard Liva, Carlton McKenzie. Robert Lyons, Charles Masison, 
Dewey Santacroce, Roger Freeman, Neil Uoherty: Second Row: Jr. Mgr. Carl Briggs, Carl Bergors, George 
O'Niel, Allan Masison, William Jackson. John Galliatl, William Mills. Soph. Mgr. Jerome Pickett, Coach Oral 
Page; Third Row: Fresh. Mgr. David Sheehy. Parker Whittle III. Peter Johnson, Donald Whittemore. Phillip 
Shepherd, Clayton Stone, Paul Estabrook, Richard Smith, William Kannaly, Henry Appleby. 



WINTER TRACK 

Under the watchful eyes of Coach Oral Page, and paced by fleet looted Dick 
Liva, Weymouth's winter runners enjoyed a most successful season. 

In dual meets Boston College High, Dedham (twice) , Brooklinc, and 
Huntington Prep all felt the sting of defeat as Weymouth grabbed first straight 
wins. 

In the Northeastern Meet, which brings together many of the smaller col- 
leges and larger high schools, and is held at the Boston Y. M. C. A., "Weymouth, 
made a strong showing. 

The victory of the year came when Weymouth invaded Boston Gardens to 
race against all the other class B teams in eastern Massachusetts. By superb 
power of a well-balanced team, Weymouth brought home the championship 
trophy for the third time in four years. 



Page Seventy-six < \j^ 



First Row: Coach Oral Page, C. Masison, F. Newcomb, D. Santacroce, R. Lyons, Capt. C. McKenzie, A. 
Robinson, A. Masison, D. Smith, F. Clain, R. Steele; Second Row: W. Kannaly, D. Clark, R. Parsons, A. 
Cook, R. Travis, P. Estabrook, C. Stone, R. Freeman, E. Alemian, G. O'Brien, Mgr. J. Nesson; Third 
Row: R. Sherman, D. Almquist, W. Jackson, W. Mills, P. Johnson, C. Bergfors, R. Fenderson, N. Smith, 
D. Swan, Mgr. J. Pickett. 

SPRING TRACK 

^ViiEN the snow had melted and spring was here for good, Coach Oral Page 
took his track team from the boards of Libby Field to the cinders of Legion Field. 

With unusual strength in every event the maroons are making it tough for 
all the opposition as their excellent winter record is continued. 

This year's South Shore meet will be bigger and therefore more exciting 
than last year's due to the addition of three more schools; namely, Quincy, North 
Quincy, and Brockton. 

Following this comes the toughest test of the year, the state meet held at 
Newton, in which every runner exerts every ounce of his strength and skill. 

May the future track teams of Weymouth continue the good records of 
sportmanship and victories as those of the past. 



C^SV, Page Seventy'seven 



First Row : Donald Swan, Arnold Cook, Robert Parsons, Carl Bergfors, Capt. Roger Freeman, Carl McKenzie, 
Robert Horscli, Mgr. Jack Angeline; Second Row: Coach O. A. Page, Mgr. Jack Nesson, Allan Masison, William 
Mills, Peter Johnson, Arthur Robinson, Donald Whittemore, Jack Nickerson. 



hen the average high-school student hears about cross-country, he has little 
or no interest for this sport, which is actually the toughest of them all. However, 
this year's team, under the coaching of Mr. Page, has made the fans take an in- 
terest, so excellent is their record. Nine times Weymouth raced in dual meets, 
and nine times they brought home victory. Facing much tougher conditions in 
the state meet at Franklin Park, Weymouth placed fourth among twelve schools. 
To name certain members of the team as "stars" woidd be wrong for everyone in 
the above picture deserves equal credit for this great season. 
The Record (low score victories) : 



CROSS-COUNTRY 




Weymouth 20 
Weymouth 17 
Weymouth 27 
Weymouth 23 
Weymouth 26 
Weymouth 20 
Weymouth 19 
Weymouth 24 
Weymouth 21 



Braintree 36 
Rockland 47 



Everett Vocational 28 



Braintree 36 
Arlington 29 
Brookline 39 
Rockland 36 
Milton 36 



Everett Vocational 34 



Page Seventy-eight c \&~? 




Front Row: Ronald Bresnahan, Robert McCarthy, Doris Robinson, Allan Patterson; Second Row: Donald 
Ramsay, Thomas Petze, Mr. David Matthews, Charles Mclntire, Robert Marr; Third Row: Clayton Brown, 
Donald Nicol, James Chase, Lars Egon. 



CHESS CLUB 

The national resurgence toward chess is reflected in the strong interest in the 
game at Weymouth High School. Although many learned the game from their 
"GI" brothers or fathers, a number were taught by the club sponsor, Mr. David 
Matthews. The Round Robin Tournament gave opportunity for each member 
to compete against the various styles of play acquired by each of the players. Refer- 
ence books were used for observation of the methods of the grand masters of chess. 
These, together with individual instruction in the openings and checkmates b" 
Mr. Matthews, laid a basis for sound developement in play and future success in the 
sport. The group should be ready for interscholastic participation next year. 

The officers and members were: 

Robert McCarthy, President 

Robert Marr, Vice-President 

Allan Patterson, Secretary 

Ronald Bresnahan, Treasurer 
Clayton Brown, James Chase, Ralph Colletta, Jr., Lars Egon, Roald Heitman, 
Robert Rosa, Charles Mclntire, Donald Nichols, Thomas Petze, Donald Ramsay, 
Doris Robinson. 



£^SV» Page Seventy'nine 



Left to Right : Margaret Kelly and Shirley Osborn co-eaptains, Helen Keblis, Jean Keohan, Barbara Loud, 
Priscilla Schlusemeyer, Jean Walsh, Barbara Dwyer. 



JL his past year the cheerleaders of Weymouth High have proved themselves 
solidly behind their various athletic teams.' 

At each football game they were seen, rain or shine, cheering for the boys. 
Their attractive maroon and gold outfits added much to their action. The cheer- 
leaders were also present at many of the basketball games showing their great 
spirit and sportsmanship. The entire scpiad also attended the Winter State Track. 
Meet at the Boston Garden and were honored with a special invitation to be present 
at a track meet held at the Fargo Barracks in Boston. 

The able co-captains were Margie Kelly and Shirley Osborn, whose duties were 
to conduct many of the student rallies and turn out a capable line of cheerleaders. 

In all, there arc five seniors leaving this year and making way lor an almost 
complete new group to be led by Priscilla Schlusemeyer. We extend good luck to 
Priscilla and the coming cheerleaders. 



Page Eighty c \&^ 



CHEERLEADERS 





First Row: Richard O'brien, John Angeline, Bill Mcintosh, Donald Swan, Jack Nesson, Greg Macri,; 
Second Row: Robert Goodspeed, Fred Hayes, Jerome Pickett, Jack Nickols, Rodney Steele, Earl Binckley, 
A. Laneau 



MANAGERS' CLUB 

The Managers' Club, which was organized this year by Mr. Lyond, consists of the 
managers of all the different sports. Speakers interested in school sports have 
addressed the weekly meetings. Prominent among these were Mr. Page and Mrs. 
Arlanson. 

During the latter part of April the Club attended a banquet at Hingham 
which was a get-together of the managers of all the schools of the South Shore. 
Incidentally, Mr. Harry Arlanson was the principal speaker. 

Officers for the year are: 

Presiden I — Donald Swan 

Secret a ry-Treas u re r — W i 1 liam Mcln tosl 1 



c^V> Page Eighty-one 



First Row: Mary Fraser, Jeanne Fopiana, Dorothy Kinsley, Geraldine Bastula, Shirley Lynch .Barbara Hill, 
Evelyn Forest, Patricia O'Leary, Margaret O'Brien; Second Row: Charles Hastie, Raymond Evans. John Bray_ 
shaw, Arlene Wood. Jean Norve. Jean Gourley, Carl Peterson; Third Row: Ralph Peach, Ralph Walo. Albert 
Landers, Thomas Fisher, John Stuart, Carl Hulteen; Fourth Row: James Heffernan, Franklin Smith, Edward 
Adams, Robert Carter, Robert Warren, George Bicknell, Kurt Konrad ; Fifth Row : Robert Sullivan, Arnold 
Cook, John Brocklesby. 



1 he Projection Club, under the direction of Mr. Ghiorse, was organized in 
December. The students received eight weeks instruction in the operation ol 
projectors. At the end of the course all members were issued membership cards. 
The purpose of the club is to train students to operate projection machines when- 
ever needed for classes. 
Officers are: 




CLUB 




President — Kurt Konrad 
Secretary — Mary Fraser 



Page Eighty'two ^Xfi^ 




c^SVj Page Eighty'three 




Page Eighty'four 'Xi^-? 



CLASS WILL 




WE 



the graduating class of Weymouth High School, in 
Lord, one-thousand n ne-hundred and forty-six, in said county 
'he Commonwealth of Massachusetts, be ng of unquestionable 
foresight, in a spirit of charity and goodfellowship do bequeath 

To 211, we leave a special wastebasket for future gum-c 
To Miss White, we leave an atomizer full of DDT, with which to 
odor of gum. 

To 212, we leave a high chair to enable Miss Silverman to see 
behind desk covers. We also leave a thumbtack puller, to help her 
i ac ks from the desks. 



the year of our 
of Norfolk, in 

intelligence and 
the following: 

hewing experts, 
destroy the stale 

what is going on 
reclaim thumb- 



To 216, we leave a lock for the swinging door to keep out the continous flow of 
students from 217. We leave an extra teachers desk for students who wish to take 
over the class. 

To 217, we leave a mop and a pail for future pupils of Miss Norris. We leave a 
recording machine to save her from saying so often, "All right, now, sit clown." 

To 218, we leave a shiny new gavel to rap for strict attention in the room. 
Pencil tapping doesn't make sufficient impression on the active students. 

To 224, we leave a mechanical robot, whose sole job it will be to inspect the 
desks for Miss Pearson once a week. 

To Room 6, we leave Mr. Nelson's witty little tricks, like tossing paper over 
his back into the wastebasket. 

To Mr. Whittle, we leave a donation to buy 2,000 pairs of soft-soled shoes to 
be worn by all students en route to the hall. We leave a loud speaker in the hall 
to save his voice at assemblies. We also leave a large outside office for the many 
students who deem it necessary to take that trip. 

To Mr. Lyons, we leave an entire new staff of efficient and attractive young 
ladies to be his secretaries. 

To Mr. Whipple, we leave a rug, which he may place in front of his desk, 
so that the daily long line of students coming in and out, will not wear out the floor. 

To Mr. Parker, the assistant director of the Trade School, we leave Bob Morton 
and Tony, with truck and staff to take care of the school grounds. 



c^SVj Page Eighty'five 



To Mr. Delahunt, we leave a large laboratory with one hundred microscopes. 

To Miss Lyons, the girls' lunch room guardian, we leave a shepherd's stall to 
keep her sheep from jumping in line. 

To Mr. Martin, we leave five seniors with loud, strong voices for the oratorical 

contests. 

To Mr. Jack, we leave a pair of mechanical hands. "Null said." 

To Mr. Mahn, we leave the commando course at Legion Field to keep future 
seniors ill good physical shape. 

To Mr. Butler, our attendance officer, we leave a jet-propelled automobile, so 
that he can track down and capture those brain ch.ldren who think they can get b\ 
with skipping school. 

To Mr. Whittemore, we leave a force of young freshmen to keep his black- 
boards clean. 

To Mr. Sherwood, we leave a mechanical man that can travel about with him 
to take the dents out ol his lenders. 

To Mr. Duncan, we leave a competent force of seniors to run his shop. 

To Mr. Bryan and Mr. Bacon of the auto shop, we leave the hopes of a new 
addition to ther shop to keep the extra stock. 

To Mr. Klay, we leave a joyous welcome and a new set of drawing boarcL 
with plenty of thumbtacks lor his mechanical-drawing classes. 

To Miss Fortier, our competent secretary we leave a new mechanical pencil 
to write out late bus slips. 

To Mr. Pollard, we leave the idea and hope of enlarging his homeroom, 
Room 2. 

To Mr. Clark, we leave an extra freight car in which to keep h s surplus steel 
(if he has any surplus) . 

To Mr. Boland, we leave the nickname of "Uncle Jim." 

To the baseball team, we leave six row boats, so that Mr. Arlanson can assume 
his old rank of being in charge of the fleet. 

To the football scjuad, we leave an electric washer, so that they will not use all 
of their energy in cleaning the mud from their uniforms. 

To Mr. Gannon we leave Henry Boucher and a bid to next year's Tech Tour- 
nament. 

To Mr. Page, we leave enough material to make new track suits for all his 
candidates. 

To the cheerleaders, we leave a record to remind Prise ilia to stay in line. 

To Room 304, we leave a slide, so that the pupils will save energy and get to 
lunch more quickly. 

To the juniors, we leave the problems of graduation. 

To the Sophomores, we leave the joys of being an upper classman. 

To the Freshmen we leave an atom bomb to do with as they please. 

And, last but not least, we leave with a sigh of relief, for we have finished 
school. 

Page Eighty-six r V&^ 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



c^V. Page Eighty'seven 



TO GIRL GRADUATES 




WHO'D LIKE VITAL 

human interest" work 



For girls who are looking beyond 
graduation to a good-paying job that's full of 
"human interest," here's an opportunity 
worth investigating. 

The Telephone Company has several open- 
ings for girls finishing high school. Recent 
high school graduates who've become tele- 
phone girls find the work interesting; asso- 
ciates friendly; surroundings pleasant. 

Seniors should look into this opportunity. 
Training courses may be arranged so as not to 
interfere with studies or graduation, and can 
usually be given right in the home town. Sign 
up right away and receive pay while learning. 



Your teacher or vocational advisor can tell you 
more about work in this interesting industry. 



NEW ENGLAND TELEPHONE & TELEGRAPH COMPANY 



Page Eighty-eight r \&J 



PLYMOUTH ROCK 


c~>caite^t 


ICE CREAM 


385 NOK1H AVhINUE, NORTH ABINGTON, MASS. 


Tel. Rockland 1620 


Compliments of 


ALEMIAN'S 


PERRY'S 


Groceries 

Imported and Domestic 




Delicatessen Fruit 
Candy Ice Cream 


COLUMBIAN SQUARE 


718 BROAD STREET 


SOUTH WEYMOUTH 



EAST WEYMOUTH 

Tel. Wey. 0143 
— — — ^ — — — — — 



c^SV. Page Eighty'nine 



Compliments of 


A FRIEND 


Compliments of 


Compliments of 


ELBRIDGE NASH 


CAMEO 


DRUG CO. 


THEATRE 


WILLIAM B. NASH, Reg. Pharm. 




COLUMBIAN SQUARE 


COLUMBIAN SQUARE 


SOUTH WEYMOUTH 


SOUTH WEYMOUTH 


Tel. Wey 2388 





Page Ninety *\2 > ~' 



Compliments of 


CAIN'S LOBSTER HOUSE 


JESSEMAN'S 


Compliments of 


HARDWARE STORE 


Dr. Charles B. Hopkins 


Compliments of 


D. M. D. 


FRED E. RAND 




COLUMBIAN SQUARE 
SOUTH WEYMOUTH 


COLUMBIAN SQUARE 
SOUTH WEYMOUTH 



c^V> Page Ninety-one 



CONGRATULATIONS 

to the 

CLASS of 1946 

from the 
ENTIRE PERSONNEL 
at 

REMICK'S 



CORBOBROS. 


Compliments of 


FREE DELIVERY 


Dr. Jordan P. Sandman 




D. D. S. 


Meats Sea Foods 




Groceries 




751 BROAD STREET 


COLUMBIAN STREET 


EAST WEYMOUTH 






SOUTH WEYMOUTH 


Telephone 2026-1485 





Page Ninetytwo C \J^> 



C. C. SHEPHERD 


FUNERAL 


HOME 


SOUTH WEYMOUTH 


VICTORY 


Lots of 


SHOE REPAIR AND 


GOOD LUCK 


SHOE STORE 


to you 




YOUNG GRADUATES 


+ 








3 UNION STREET 




COLUMBIAN SQUARE 


Olden's Pharmacy 


SOUTH WEYMOUTH 


South Weymouth 



c^!V> Page Ninety-three 



hUGbJNb S 


SPEARS 


TAILOR SHOP 


FLOWER SHOP 


East Weymouth, Mass. 










CORSAGES 


MADE-TO-MEASURE SUITS 






Member Florists' 




Telegraph Delivery 


Cleaning Pressing 


Association 




BROAD STREET 


Alterations 


EAST WEYMOUTH 




Tel. Wey. 0049 


Bring Y our Prescriptions to 


UNITED 


REIDY'S 


BURNER SERVICE 


UKUb olUKt 






Silent Glow 


839 BROAD STREET 


Oil Burner 


EAST WEYMOUTH 






Heating Stoker 


D.G. GODIN HOME PHONE WEY. 3813-W 


Electrical Appliances 


YELLOW CAB 


Practical Shower and 




W/ *> ri ri i n rr l^iffc 

TT C LI CI 1 1 1 V.J 11 I ' 


TAXI 


lei. Weymouth 3566 


JACKSON SQUARE 


924 Broad Street East Weymouth 


EAST WEYMOUTH 




Tel. Wey. 1630 



Page Ninety'four *\&^ 



Compliments of 


LOVELL BUS LINES 


Compliments of 


Compliments of 

FRANK NESS 


CLARK'S 




MARKET 


COLUMBIAN SQUARE 
SOUTH WEYMOUTH 




JUNCTION RTE. 3 and 18 
WEYMOUTH 


COLUMBIAN SQUARE 
SOUTH WEYMOUTH 


PARK AVE. AND RTE. 128 


SOUTH WEYMOUTH 



c5A» Page Ninety-five 





SEALTEST ICE CREAM 


Kitchenware and Garden Supplies 


SODA CANDY 


Carmote Paints and Varnishes 






BURRELL'S 


ARTHUR M. JUSTICE 


VARTFTY 


T T A T> TAX Y 7 A FIT" 1 

HARDWARE 


STORF 

o x v^rvxj/ 








I obacco — Cigars — Groceries 




Newspaper — Magazines 


EAST WEYMOUTH 






948 BROAD STREET 


Telephone Weymouth 0773-M 


EAST WEYMOUTH 




Telephone Weymouth 0620 




DUJNLAJN 


DONOVAN 




DRUG 


MacJSJ^LLAK 




M. P. Garey Agency 


CORP 


T 




INSURANCE 


Weymouth and Hingham 


ui Ijvci y JL/cociiuuuii 






DELIVERY SERVICE 


JACKSON SQUARE 


EAST WEYMOUTH 




Tel. Wey. 1170 



Page Ninety'six 



Under New Management 


\T7rvr\r\T a xtf\ o T"* t t t"\ t /^v 

WOODLAND STUDIO 


58 COMMERCIAL STREET 


WEYMOUTH, MASS. 


Telephone 1464 


Candid 


Weddings 


Children and Adult Portraits 


Congratulations 


Compliments 


Class of '46 
WEYMOUTH 


of 

WEYMOUTH 


THEATRE 

*\&^ 


MUSIC SHOP 


Weymouth Landing 


(Next to Weymouth Theatre) 






c-^SV> Page Ninety'Seven 



BERNARD G. TIRRELL 


HARRY S. CUMMINGS 




Registered Pharmacist 




WEYMOUTH LANDING 


Jeweler 










We will not be 




knowingly undersold. 


71 WASHINGTON STREET 




WEYMOUTH, MASS. 


Braintree Town Prescriptions 




may be filled at our store. 


vjciicrdi 


BELLINGHAM 


Flooring Co. 


HARDWARE CO. 




>^ 
T 




r LUUKli>l vj 


ALWAYS AT 




YOUR SFRVTCF 






745 BROAD STREET 




WASHINGTON SQUARE 


EAST WEYMOUTH 




WEYMOUTH 


Tel. Wcy. 1039-W — 1039-R 






Tel. Wey. 2228 


VITO DeLUCA 





Page Ninety'eight t \&~> 



Don't Forget 

VETERANS' 
WELCOME-HOME DAY 

SEPTEMBER 28 
Legion Field 

FOOTBALL - Weymouth vs. Belmont 

BEST OF LUCK 

TO THE CLASS OF '46 

from the 

JUNIOR CLASS 



c^V> Page Ninety'nine 



Compliments 



of 



A FRIEND 



I. BLOOM and SONS 

MARKET 

Serving Weymouth 
for over 35 years 

LINCOLN SQUARE 
Weymouth 024S 



Congratulations 

to the 

Graduates 

Smith's 
Variety Store 

82 BROAD STREET 
Lincoln Square 
WEYMOUTH 



Compliments of 

E. M. DWYER 

MILK 
CREAM 



Page One Hundred C \S^'